Logic and Presentation of Problem-Solving (GS-IM- 400)
Understanding and presenting research in a logical manner is a critical skill for scientists. This course dissects of the logic of problem-solving science through using the rubrics of “OPTEMA” (Observations; Problematization; Testable ideas; Experimental design: Methods; and Analysis) and teaches both logical analysis and presentation through the One Figure Journal Club in which class participants including the instructor work through a single journal club article. In addition, the elements of scientific discourse, scientific statements with their associated citations, are approached using the evidential typology of Bruno Latour and a typology of citation –functions.
Credits: 1
Term: 1
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N
Director: Dr. John Rodgers


Logic and Rhetoric of Writing Science (GS-IM- 401)
Uses structure-functional analysis of scientific text to teach techniques of reading and writing science articles based on logic and rhetoric principles of  transdiscourse (including summary, synopsis, paraphrase and, occasionally, quotation) and metadiscourse (including hedges and boosts). 
Credits: 1
Term: 2
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N
Director: Dr. John Rodgers


Logic and Rhetoric of Writing Proposals (GS-IM- 402)

This course covers the logic of experimental design for general experimentation and grant proposals and the art of persuasion as it pertains to grant proposals. It will also cover the needs to students preparing for qualifying exams.
Credits: 1
Term: 4
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N
Director: Dr. John Rodgers


Clinical Aspects of Immunology (GS-IM- 405)

This course is designed for immunology students to learn more about the roles and importance of immunology in various human diseases and animal models, including cancer immunology, autoimmune diseases, infectious/tropical diseases, allergy and immunodeficiency. The goals of this course are to introduce students to these active research topics, to bridge basic immunology to clinical immunology, and motivate them for the selection of their own research topics related to important human diseases.  This course will combine faculty lectures (50%), student presentations of scientific papers and student-designed future directions in the selected topics (50%).
Credits: 3 
Term: 5 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: Y 
Director: Dr. Richard Cook


Seminars in Immunology Research (GS-IM-407) 
Graduate students will attend a weekly research seminar series. Presentations in this series are by Baylor Faculty, Postdoctoral Fellows and Graduate students as well as presentations by scientists from other institutions. Students having passed their Qualification Exam will present their laboratory research once per year. Faculty and student evaluators will provide student presenters with useful written and oral feedback on their presentations based on anchored rubrics.
Credits: 1
Term: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N
Director: Dr. Gretchen Diehl
 

Immunology (GS-IM- 423)
This is a series of lectures stressing basic concepts in immunology. These include immunoanatomy and cytology, innate immunity, development of the immune system, immunoglobulin structure and genetics, antigen-antibody reactions, the major histocompatibility complex and antigen presentation, T cell receptors (genetics, structure, selection), T cell activation and effector functions,  cell trafficking, phagocytic cell functions, immune responses to infections organisms and tumors, autoimmunity, allergies and immunodeficiency. The course includes weekly reviews led by senior graduate students that help to explore and clarify concepts.
Credits: 3 
Term: 2 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: Y 
Director: Dr. Jonathan Levitt


Regulation of Immune Responses (GS-IM- 425)
This course is composed of mini-lectures by faculty (30%) and student presentations and discussions of articles (70%) from the current literature. Students receive written constructive comments from the instructors to help improve their presentation content and style. The focus of the articles, selected by the participating faculty, is on the cells, proteins and mechanisms that regulate cellular and humoral immune responses. Topics that are covered include pathways for antigen presentation by MHC molecules, thymic selection, T cell receptor structure/function, T cell co-stimulation, regulatory and memory T cells, dendritic cells, NK, CD4 and CD8 cell function, autophagy, toll-like receptors, cell-cell interaction molecules, and B cell activation and differentiation.  
Credits: 3 
Term: 3 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: Y 
Director: Dr. Richard Cook


Molecular Immunology (GS-IM- 428)
This course consists of a series of faculty lectures (50%) and student-led discussions (50%) of major molecular mechanisms that control immune responses. Students receive written constructive comments from the instructors to help improve their presentation content and style. The course approaches the subject of immunology from the viewpoints of innate immunity, the immunological synapse, ion channels, central and peripheral tolerance, microRNA control of gene regulation in lymphocytes, lymphocyte activation and CTL killing. Each student develops a research proposal in an area covered in the course, guided by the companion course GS-IM 406.   
Credits: 3 
Term: 4 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: Y 
Director: Dr. Richard Cook


Special Projects (GS-IM- 435)
Faculty mentored research for students that have not been admitted to candidacy.
Credits: Variable 
Term: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N 
Director: Dr. John Rodgers


Immunology Journal Club (GS-IM- 446)
This course consists of weekly meetings, attended by students and faculty, for student presentations and discussions of high impact literature in immunology. These weekly meetings are considered a part of a student’s education. Students are required to attend all immunology seminars.
Credits: 1 
Term: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N
Director: Dr. Min Chen


Special Topics (GS-IM- 463)
Scholarly study directed by a faculty member. Special topics allows a faculty member to develop individualized courses for students. Special topics cannot be used to satisfy the 30 hr course requirement.
Credits: Variable 
Term: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N 
Director: Dr. John Rodgers


Readings (GS-IM- 548)
Faculty-directed literature projects that survey a specialized topic of interest.
Credits: Variable 
Term: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N 
Director: Dr. John Rodgers


Research Rotation (GS-IM- 549)
Faculty-mentored research for students who have not yet selected a faculty advisor.
Credits: Variable 
Term: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N 
Director: Dr. John Rodgers


Dissertation (GS-IM- 550)
Thesis research directed by a faculty mentor and advisory committee. Open only to candidates for the Ph.D. or M.S. degree.
Credits: Variable 
Term: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N 
Director: Dr. John Rodgers