Organization of the Cell (GS-GS-501)
This course covers the principles of cellular organization and communication. The emphasis will be on cellular compartmentation, communication within and among cells, and the maintenance of cellular structure. The general features of proteostasis (i.e., protein homeostasis) in normal disease scenarios will be discussed. Protein import and export will include the endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus, lysosome and peroxisome as well as vesicular transport and secretion. Signaling within the cell will emphasize G-protein coupled signal transduction, calcium signaling and growth factors. The structural maintenance of cellular morphology will discuss the cytoskeleton, myosin, intermediate filaments and junctional complexes.
Credits: 2 
Term: 1 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: Y 
Director: Dr. Rick Sifers and Dr. Karl-Dimiter Bissig

Molecular Methods (GS-GS-502)
Molecular Methods covers methods for studying and manipulating DNA, RNA, and proteins; these range from the most basic to state-of-the-art technologies available in the Baylor College of Medicine Advanced Technology Cores. Nucleic acid topics include DNA manipulation, cloning, preparation of libraries, sequencing, next generation sequencing, genomic profiling, RNA interference and CRISPR/Cas9.  Protein topics include protein expression and purification, antibody generation and applications, flow cytometry, methods to detect/visualize protein-protein interactions, proteomics/mass spectrometry, and high throughput methods to study protein/protein and protein/DNA interactions.
Credits: 3 
Term: 1 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: Y 
Director: Dr. Nancy Weigel

Genetics A (GS-GS-503)
This course will discuss the general principles of genetics and its implication for inheritance and variation in living organisms. First, the concepts of the gene and mutation will be introduced and their link to phenotype will be discussed. This is followed by linkage, complementation and non-Mendelian inheritance. The use of genetics as a research tool is illustrated by the molecular basis of phenotype, the dissection of genetic pathways, and the use of genetic techniques in bacteria, yeast and Humans.
Credits: 2 
Term: 1 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: Y 
Director: Dr. Christophe Herman and Dr. Herman Dierick

Genetics B (GS-GS-504)
This course focuses on introducing genetic approaches offered by different model organisms for solving biological problems, understanding how these models can address problems related to human diseases, and learning technical terms and concepts unique to each system. Yeast genetics will be used to demonstrate how to order genes in a genetic pathway.  Classical and modern genetic methods for studying gene function in C. elegans during development will be discussed, as will use of Drosophila genetics to study pattern formation, mutation isolation and mapping and mosaic analysis. Mouse genetics (gene knock-out, generating specific strains by crosses, and the use of transgenic approaches) and human genetics (linkage and pedigree analysis, gene mapping and analysis, and population biology and evolution) will be covered.
Credits: 2 
Term: 2 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: Y 
Director: Dr. Zheng Zhou

Cell Division (GS-GS-505)
This course examines the fundamental concepts in cell cycle regulation, DNA, telomeres and chromatin duplication, chromosome segregation as well as cytokinesis. The course presents principals of cellular response to DNA damage, telomere dysfunction, perturbation in DNA replication and chromosome segregation. The molecular mechanisms of various DNA repair pathways including recombination and their regulation in cell cycle will be discussed. The relevance of cell cycle in growth regulation, development and cancer will be presented.
Credits: 2 
Term: 2 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: Y 
Director: Dr. Grzegorz Ira and Dr. Eric Chang

Development (GS-GS-506)
The Development of a mature organism from a single cell is one of the most fascinating problems in biology. Understanding development can shed light on fundamental processes such as gene regulation and control of the cell cycle, and on translational problems such as the origins and progression of cancer and the possibility of tissue engineering and regeneration to treat human disease. This course of 12 lectures is designed as an introduction to some of the concepts of modern developmental biology.
Credits: 2 
Term: 2 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: Y 
Director: Dr. Andrew K. Groves

Cancer (GS-GS-508)
This is a short course on the biology of cancer.  The course objective is to introduce students to basic mechanisms that lead to tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis. A history of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and their modern definitions are presented.  Current concepts of cancer stem cells, tumor microenvironment, mouse models, and cancer therapeutics are discussed.  Class includes lecture and group discussion of key recent papers in which students are expected to participate. 
Credits: 1 
Term: 2 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: Y
Director: Dr. Stephanie Pangas

Gene Regulation (GS-GS-509)
This course focuses on the mechanisms of regulated gene expression with a focus on eukaryotes. The course begins with RNA polymerase and transcriptional regulation through transcription factors, enhancers/repressors, co-transcriptional regulation, and the effects of chromatin structure and histone modification. The details of pre-mRNA processing are covered including the major and minor splicesomes, polyadenylation, alternative splicing, and RNA editing. Mechanisms of regulation by noncoding RNAs including miRNAs, siRNAs, piRNAs and lncRNAs are also considered. Mechanisms of regulation of translation and protein degradation complete the discussion.
Credits: 3 
Term: 3 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: Y 
Director: Dr. Thomas Cooper

Neuroscience (GS-GS-511) 
This is an introductory course covering fundamental aspects of modern neuroscience. The lecture series begins with a discussion of neural development, evolution and the resulting organization of the mammalian nervous system, then progresses into the molecular and structural specializations that allow neurons to process and transmit information via electrical current. The course next explores how neurons contribute to autonomic functions that keep us alive and higher brain functions such as learning and memory. The course will close on an examination of how neural dysfunction leads to common neurological disorders such as developmental pathophysiologies, autism, and Alzheimer’s disease.
Credits: 1
Term: 3 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: Y 
Director: Dr. Russell Ray

Immunology (GS-GS-512)
In the field of biology, the immune system is unique in that it crosses all organ boundaries and affects a vast number of processes critical for organismal function and survival. This short course introduces the basic cellular and molecular mechanisms of immunity. These include: the innate immune system (molecular “danger” patterns); the acquired immune system (B and T cell receptor gene rearrangement and their effector functions); the cross-talk between innate and acquired immunity; an overview of the principles of immune tolerance exemplified by mechanisms of transplant rejection and cancer immunity; and a discussion of autoimmune diseases and immunotherapies.
Credits: 1 
Term: 3 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: Y 
Director: Dr. Jonathan Levitt

Ethics - Year 1 (GS-GS-514)
Ethics-Year 1 is the first of 4 modules on responsible conduct of research. Sessions will involve students in discussion during lectures, as well as in small groups where case studies will be reviewed. Issues surrounding data collection and documentation, research material and its ownership will be presented, as will responsible authorship, proper citation, plagiarism and copyright. A discussion will also be held for first-year students on what to look for in laboratory rotations goals, selecting mentors and keeping on track towards your degree.
Credits: 0.5 
Term: 1 (not offered in AY18)
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N 
Director: Dr. Alison Bertuch

Ethics - Year 2 (GS-GS-515)
Ethics-Year 2 is the second of 4 modules on responsible conduct of research.   The course will discuss research misconduct, including College and federal policies and procedures.  It will also review safe practices in the laboratory and the ethics of experiments with animals. This will be followed by small group discussion covering cases studies of scientific misconduct and animal research.  A discussion will also be held for second-year students and their mentors on matching goals and expectations of the mentor and student, developing communication channels and using the thesis advisory committee as a resource. 
Credits: 0.5 
Term: 2 (not offered in AY18)
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N 
Director: Dr. Alison Bertuch

Ethics - Year 3 (GS-GS-516)
Ethics-Year 3 is the third of 4 modules on responsible conduct of research.  The course will discuss writing and review of scientific manuscripts, how grant applications are reviewed including conflicts of interest in the peer-review, and financial conflicts of interest. Collaborative research arrangements, particularly with industry, will be considered along with intellectual property relative to publication and thesis submission. There will be a small group discussion covering case studies associated with these topics. A discussion will also be held for third-year students and their mentors on matching goals and expectations of the mentor and student, evaluating progress towards degree and alternative approaches for risky projects. 
Credits: 0.5 
Term: 3 (not offered in AY18)
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N 
Director: Dr. Alison Bertuch

Ethics - Year 4 (GS-GS-517)
Ethics-Year 4 is the fourth of 4 modules on responsible conduct of research. The course will discuss ethical considerations in research involving human subjects, including experiments with human derived materials and informed consent. A discussion on contemporary ethics issues and the scientist as a responsible member of society is included. This will be followed by a small group discussion covering case studies associated with these topics. A discussion will also be held for fourth-year students and their mentors on expectations of mentor and student, setting goals and timelines for graduation, career decisions and planning for the next step.
Credits: 0.5 
Term: 3 (not offered in AY18) 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N 
Director: Dr. Alison Bertuch

Macromolecules: Structure and Interactions (GS-GS-518)
This course will provide fundamental information on macromolecular structures, techniques used in structure determination, principles of thermodynamics and kinetics, and how this information can be leveraged to design/develop lead compounds to modulate disease targets for clinical relevance with the help of novel cell-based screening techniques.
Credits: 3 
Term: 3 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: Y 
Director: Dr. B.V. Venkatar Prasad and Dr. Ming Zhou

Introduction to Scientific Writing (GS-GS-519)
This course will increase student knowledge and skills in effective scientific writing. Students will learn basic principles of scientific writing that they can put into practice immediately such as selecting high impact words, building effective sentences and paragraphs, and structuring individual sections of a scientific manuscript. The course, which centers on the concept of writing with clarity and brevity, includes exercises to build skills.
Credits: 1 
Term: 4 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N 
Director: Dr. Susan Marriott

Research Design (GS-GS-522)
This course is designed to guide the student through the process of identifying a research problem, developing specific hypotheses and designing well-controlled experiments to test them. It will be taught in small groups of ~8 students/class. A faculty mentor helps formalize and organize the process, but students will develop their ideas through literature searches and discussion. The terms and discussion will center around the NIH format for grant applications (Specific Aims, Background and Significance, Experimental Design).
Credits: 3 
Term: 4 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: Y 
Director: Dr. B.V. Venkatar Prasad

Method and Logic in Molecular Biology (GS-GS-523)
This course is intended to train students to read and critically interpret the primary literature. Students will learn what constitutes a well-designed experiment with proper controls. Small groups of students (8-10) will meet twice per week to discuss two assigned journal articles. The first meeting will be without faculty participation while the second meeting will be guided by one or two instructors per group. The first meeting will allow students the opportunity to independently address the scientific merit and design of the assigned readings and formulate their own opinions. During the second meeting, instructors will guide a discussion among students to bring out the salient features of the readings pertinent to the goals of the course.
Credits: 3 
Term: 2 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: Y 
Director: Dr. Graeme Mardon and Dr. Melissa Suter

Introduction to Intellectual Property (GS-GS-525)
So you now have a great discovery or idea, how can you protect and market it?  In this course we will learn about intellectual property law and technology transfer.  We will cover different types of intellectual property, such as patents, trademarks, copyrights, etc., with an emphasis on genetic and biotechnology patents, both in the USA and internationally. We will also discuss copyrights: their nature, acquisition, and how to avoid infringing them, with an emphasis in instructional activity and educational settings. 
Credits: 1
Term: 4 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N 
Director: Dr. Patrick Turley

ABC-Applications to Biology of Computation (GS-GS-527)
The course will offer a broad survey of different topics from a computational perspective: genomics, epigenomics, population genetics, transcriptomics, proteomics, structure-function, systems biology, networks, cellular imaging, phylogenomics, pattern discovery, drug design, medical informatics, the microbiome, the cancer genome and neurosystems. The objectives are to become familiar with basic computational challenges in these fields and with the current algorithmic solutions.
Credits: 2 
Term: 2 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: Y 
Director: Dr. Olivier Lichtarge

Responsible Conduct of Research – Year 1 (GS-GS- 528)
Sessions will involve students in discussion during lectures, as well as in small groups where case studies will be reviewed. Students will be mentored on this scientific process (accessing the scientific literature, thinking with the scientific method). Issues surrounding rigor, reproducibility, research material and its ownership will be presented, as will responsible authorship, plagiarism and copyright. Classes will also be devoted to the practical aspects of being a student scientist such as what to look for in laboratory rotations, selecting mentors, coping with stress and deadlines, what to do when experiments don’t work, and how to go about career decision-making as well as professional aspects of being a scientist such as funding and advocacy.
Credits: 1
Term: 1
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N
Director: Dr. Alison Bertuch

Responsible Conduct of Research - Year 2 (GS-GS-529)
Sessions will involve students in discussion during three lectures, as well as in one small group session where case studies will be reviewed. Students will be mentored on research misconduct, focusing on topics such as falsification, fabrication and plagiarism. College and federal policies and procedures for handling misconduct allegations will be reviewed. A session with 2nd year students and their mentors will review expectations between mentor and student. Students will receive training on the ethics of biomedical studies with animals, covering topics such as when can animals be used ethically in research, the importance of avoiding unnecessary pain/suffering and euthanasia and animal use approval. The final session, which will be held in a small group discussion format with faculty facilitators, will focus on case studies involving scientific misconduct and experiments with animals.
Credits: 0.5 
Term: 2 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N 
Director: Dr. Alison Bertuch

Responsible Conduct of Research - Year 3 (GS-GS-530)
Sessions will involve students in discussion during four lectures, as well as in one small group session where case studies will be reviewed. Topics covered during this module include authorship and peer review conflicts of interest and their management and collaboration within academia and with industry. The mentorship lecture will be a meeting with 3rd year students and their mentors. The final large group session will be focused on rigor and reproducibility using interactive case studies, reviewing principles introduced in year 1. Finally, the session conducted in a small group discussion format with faculty facilitator will be utilize case studies to highlight issues relevant to the review of grants and papers, conflicts of interest and collaboration.
Credits: 0.5 
Term: 3 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N 
Director: Dr. Alison Bertuch

Responsible Conduct of Research - Year 4 (GS-GS-531)
Sessions will involve students in discussion during three lectures, as well as in one small group session where case studies will be reviewed. Topics covered during the lecture on research with human subjects will include defining what constitutes research with human subjects versus experiments with human material, confidentiality of medical data and informed consent. The mentorship session will be a meeting with 4th year students and their mentors. The lecture on the scientist as a responsible member of society will address contemporary ethical issues in biomedical research and the environmental and societal impacts of scientific research. Finally, the session conducted in a small group discussion format with faculty facilitator will utilize case studies to highlight issues relevant to research with human subjects and societal impact of research, focused on genetics/genomics, stem cells and neuroethics.
Credits: 0.5 
Term: 3 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N 
Director: Dr. Alison Bertuch

MSTP Reading (GS-GS-548)
MSTP Reading provides MSTP students early in their combined physician-scientist training with in-depth exposure to critical reading of the current biomedical literature in order to improve their ability to identify and design research strategies for solving current biomedical problems.
Credits: 1.5 
Term: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 
Counts for 30 hr. requirement: N 
Director: Dr. Sharon Plon