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Molecular and Cellular Biology

Houston, Texas

Image 1: Ovulated mouse cumulus cell oocyte complex immunostained for matrix proteins hyaluronan and versican. By JoAnne Richards, Ph.D.; Image 2: By Yi LI, Ph.D.; Image 3: Mouse oocyte at meiosis I immunostained  for tubulin (red) phosphop38MAPK (green) and DNA (blue). By JoAnne Richards,  Ph.D.;  Image 4: Expanded cumulus cell ooctye ocmplex  immunostained for hyaluronan (red), TSG6 (green) and DAN (blue). By JoAnne  Richards, Ph.D.;  Image 5: Epithelial cells taken from a mouse  mammary gland were cultured in a dish and transduced with a retrovirus  expressing two genes. The green staining shows green fluorescent protein and the red  staining shows progesterone receptor expression. The nucleus of each cell is  stained blue. Photomicrograph taken at 200X magnification.  By Sandra L. Grimm,  Ph.D.; Image 6: Ovarian vasculature (red) is excluded from the granulosa cells (blue) within growing follicles (round structures); Image 7:  Ovulated mouse cumulus cell oocyte  complex immunostained for matrix proteins hyaluronan and versican. By JoAnne Richards, Ph.D.
Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology
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Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology

Bert O'Malley

Dr. Bert O'Malley

The Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology is recognized internationally for research in regulation of gene expression, hormone action, cancer biology, molecular genetics, and gene therapy.

Specific areas of our research focus on reproductive biology, developmental biology, neurobiology, and general translational cancer biology. Our approach is to utilize molecular biological analyses in relation to the intact cell and to organ physiology.

News

Read about Dr. Bert O'Malley's award-winning work and watch his presentation, shown during the 15th Euopean Congress of Endocrinology in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Highlights

  • With the efforts of 55 graduate students, over 65 postdoctoral fellows, and a large amount of investigator funding, MCB serves as a national model for collaborative research interactions, graduate and postdoctoral training and education.

  • Annual budget exceeds $30 million in research funding from external sources and ranks second among U.S. medical school basic science departments (without a clinical component) in NIH funding

  • The MCBDepartment is a participant in a Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (SPORE) for breast cancer, a Specialized Cooperative Centers Program in Reproduction and Infertility Research (SCCPIR), a Diabetes and Endocrinology Research Center (DERC) and a multi-institutional program to compile an Atlas of Orphan Nuclear Receptors, jointly supported by four NIH Institutes.

General Areas of Research

Research interests of the large, multidisciplinary faculty focus on the molecular basis of gene regulation and the regulation of normal and abnormal cellular differentiation and growth in many animal and transgenic mouse models.

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