School of Health Professions

O & P Program Course Descriptions

Master
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Fall 1 Semester

Content

Anatomical Sciences for O&P (OPANA-62101)

Anatomical Sciences for O&P is designed to provide the student an extensive background in the fundamentals of human anatomy with an emphasis on musculoskeletal systems as related to physical rehabilitation. The course is presented in lecture, small group laboratory, and independent study format. Anatomic structures are reviewed in lecture. The student is then expected to locate, identify and explain the function and relationships of structures using cadavers, prosections, radiograph images, and static models. The course is structured to provide an anatomical basis for understanding the physical examination and structural changes associated with illness and injury of major organ and body systems.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Ming Zhang

Biomechanics I (OPBMA-62101)

The study of normal human movement, performance and function through the application of biomechanical and motor control principles with emphasis on joints, moments, and ground reaction forces. Strategies include: methods to study normal and pathological movements via gait analysis, the action and effects of external and internal forces on the musculoskeletal system, the body structure/function changes due to over-, under-, and non-use of body segments, and the influence of orthotic/prosthetic devices on skin integrity, muscular tissue, bone growth, posture, balance and mobility. Biomechanics I introduces the study and practice of evaluating and quantifying normal human movement as it relates to activities of daily living. Approaches to the study of biomechanics include gross movements of the human body, musculoskeletal, and neuromuscular considerations for human movement, dynamic force distribution, materials behavior, and lever arms. Skills pertaining to goniometric observations and concepts of linear and angular kinematic and kinetic calculations are introduced. Biomechanics I is part one of a two-part course spanning two semesters. Biomechanics I begins with an introduction to biomechanics as a discipline and explores application to human movements. Functional anatomy of the spinal column, upper limb, and lower limb are covered with considerations given to orthotic and prosthetic clinical application. Students are exposed to a variety of techniques for motion analysis including but not limited to: visual analysis, video analysis, and introduction to Zeno Walkway by Protokinetics.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Sally DiBello

Clinical Practice Management (OPCPA-62101)

Clinical Practice Management (CPM) is designed to introduce students to concepts that are second- and third-order removed from direct provision of clinical prosthetic and orthotic services. Clinical documentation is covered in great detail, as are local coverage determinations (LCDs) and letters of medical necessity (LMN’s), with examples for source materials for being drawn from concurrent core O&P course projects. While each core O&P course covers coding concepts relative to its practice area, CPM I explores the original derivation of L-Codes, which Federal governmental agencies perpetuate them and how, and how they are maintained, updated, and/or augmented over time. Finally, Clinical Outcome Measures are also introduced to complement provision of clinical services and to provide content for the other types of documentation provided.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Fanny Schultea

Cultural Competency (OPCC-62101)

The course introduces students to issues surrounding cultural awareness and sensitivity pertaining to the diversity and uniqueness of populations to be encountered as health care practitioners and elsewhere through lectures, discussions, small group activities, and participation in community events. Specifically, the course explores personal bias, communication styles, belief systems, alternative health care practices, family roles, and the relationship of these issues to perceptions of culture, socioeconomic status, and provision of healthcare.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Jonnae Atkinson

Health Behavioral Counseling (HPHBC-62201)

Health Behavioral Counseling (HBC) explores the theory and practice of counseling for health behavior change with a focus on application of Motivational Interviewing skills (MI) to many kinds of health-risk behaviors. The stages of behavior change are introduced using the framework of the Transtheoretical Model along with social learning theory. Elements of the therapeutic alliance and the principles of harm reduction are introduced along with socializing the patient to motivational health behavior change counseling. Modeling through role play is used to develop and refine a student’s ability to identify risk, assess readiness for change, and offer messages designed to strengthen the patient’s commitment to change. Observations of self-help and patient support group sessions are used to further socialize students to the degree to which individuals are committed to change. These experiences will help the student develop an intimate understanding of the process of change and thereby increase empathy for patients attempting to improve their own health behaviors and adhere to potentially challenging treatment regimens.

Credit: 1.5 semester hours
Course Director: Beth Garland

Lower Limb Orthotic Management I (OPLOA-67101)

Lower Limb Orthotic Management I (LLO I) includes orthotic management of all aspects of the lower limb below the knee. This course integrates principles of supporting the foot with orthoses and foot wear (Pedorthics) as indicated. Devices explored in depth include the large number of variants of ankle-foot orthoses (AFO’s) used regularly in modern lower-limb, orthotic practice. Bony and muscular anatomy, surface anatomy, kinesiology, weight-bearing strategies, and biometrics relative to the foot and ankle and gait are covered in depth. Conditions commonly treated with footwear and orthoses of the feet and/or ankles are explored, historical orthotic approaches are reviewed, and modern treatment philosophies are covered in depth. Students learn about, observe, and then perform essential aspects of foot and ankle orthotic care, including patient assessment and communication, device design recommendation, measurement and casting, component and material selection, positive model optimization, device fabrication, device application and fitting principles, gait deviation detection and diagnosis, patient device training including shoe wear, device maintenance, and patient follow up.

Credit: 7 semester hours
Course Director: Sally DiBello

Lower Limb Prosthetic Management I (OPLPA-68101)

Lower Limb Prosthetic Management 1 (LLP I) covers a comprehensive range of prosthetic management of amputation levels of the lower limb through the tibia and points distal. Bony and muscular anatomy, surface anatomy, kinesiology, and biometrics relative to the lower limb are covered in depth. Conditions resulting in lower limb amputation are explored, historical prosthetic approaches to transtibial prosthetics practices are reviewed, and modern transtibial prosthetic devices, components, and philosophies are covered in depth. Students learn about, observe, and then perform essential aspects of transtibial, ankle-disarticulation, and partial-foot prosthetic care including patient assessment and communication, K-Level evaluation and designation, device design recommendation, measurement and casting, component and material selection, positive model optimization, device fabrication, prosthetic alignment and transfer, device application and fitting principles, gait deviation detection, patient device training, gait considerations, device maintenance, volume management, and patient follow up.

Credit: 8 semester hours
Course Director: Amandi Rhett

Technical and Safety Skills I (OPTSA-62101)

Technical and Safety Skills I explores foundational lab and safety skills required to practice orthotics and prosthetics.  The course will focus on instructing students in the materials specifically used in the construction of orthotic and prosthetic devices; the properties of metals, plastics, foams, leather, and other materials; direct applications of materials to devices and components in O&P. The course will also focus on introducing students to safety protocols in the O&P lab, appropriate use of tools and equipment, and casting and fabrication protocols. This course will align with the fabrication projects which take place in the O&P core courses and will cover basic techniques for taking impressions, modifying positive models, and fabricating thermoplastic devices.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Jeremy Sherman

Pathophysiology for O&P (OPPAT-62101)

Pathophysiology for O&P introduces to students the clinical procedures, conditions, and sequelae an orthotist/prosthetist encounters and addresses routinely. This course explores the interrelated physiological links, clinical presentations, and biomechanical goals associated with these conditions illustrating the rationale for general orthotic/prosthetic intervention. Specific O&P treatment indications are explored in the corresponding core orthotic and/or prosthetic course.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Lisa Abernethy

Pedorthic Management (OPPED-64101)

Pedorthic Management covers orthotic management of the foot and ankle. Devices covered are those distal to the malleoli. Examples of devices include therapeutic shoes, accommodative foot orthoses, functional foot orthoses, and subtalar control foot orthoses (UCBL FO’s). The course provides an overview of custom shoe wear, as well as shoe modifications. Bony, muscular, and neurological anatomy is reviewed, along with pathological conditions of the foot and ankle. Foot and lower limb pathologies, kinesiology, gait analysis, and orthotic treatments are explored in depth. Students learn about, observe, and then perform essential aspects of pedorthic management, including patient evaluation and initial assessment, impression taking, device design, positive model modification, material selection, device fitting, device modification, and patient outcome assessment.

Credit: 4 semester hours
Course Director: Lisa Abernethy

Physical Examination I (OPPEA-62101)

Physical Examination (PE) explores the full scope of a physical bodily exam in the context of the evaluation for and provision of clinical O&P services. Physical Examination has emphasis on manually determining the range of motion (ROM) and muscle strength testing (MMT) of major joints in the body with respect to typical presentation and common pathological conditions, inclusive of musculoskeletal, neurological, congenital, and developmental conditions. Students will develop an ability to perform a comprehensive physical examination in order to derive appropriate orthotic or prosthetic interventions.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Ashley Mullen

Upper Limb Orthotic Management (OPULO-64101)

Upper Limb Orthotic Management covers a comprehensive range of orthotic management of all aspects of the upper limb. Examples of devices include orthoses for the shoulder, elbow, forearm, wrist, hand, thumb, and fingers. Bony and muscular anatomy, surface anatomy, kinesiology, and biometrics relative to the upper limb are reviewed, and conditions commonly treated with upper limb orthoses are explored alongside their corresponding historical and contemporary approaches to orthotic intervention. Students learn about, observe, and then perform essential aspects of upper limb orthotic care including: patient assessment and communication, device design recommendation, measurement and casting, component and material selection, positive model optimization, device fabrication, device application and fitting principles, patient device training, device maintenance, and patient follow up.

Credit: 4 semester hours
Course Director: Jeremy Sherman

Spring 1 Semester

Biomechanics II (OPBMB-62202)

Biomechanics II continues the study and practice of evaluating and quantifying human movement through simple and complex means begun in Biomechanics I. Established, “low-tech,” clinically-relevant measures and clinical outcomes instruments that individual practitioners may perform on a regular basis with minimum initial investment begin this course. Both quantitative and qualitative varieties are explored, including surveys. Students also gain experience evaluating novel instruments approaching validity for use in O&P. Biomechanical principles and clinical O&P concepts are applied to gait / movement studies of moderate- to high-tech approaches, up to and including a fully-equipped, motion-analysis laboratory. Application of fundamental biomechanical principles to clinical practice is accomplished through presentation of clinical scenarios and corresponding biomechanical rationale for orthotic and/or prosthetic intervention.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Ashley Mullen

Technical and Safety Skills II (OPTSB-62201)

This course follows Technical and Safety Skills I in augmenting instruction surrounding the fabrication projects in O&P core courses.  The course will revisit foundational techniques, as well as introduce advanced impression, modification, and fabrication processes.  Through a series of fabrication projects, students will become adept at thermoforming and lamination.  Additionally, students will be introduced to CADCAM applications and principles.  The course will prepare students to understand complex fabrication principles and generate detailed work orders for design implementation

Credit: 2 semester hour
Course Director: Jeremy Sherman

Health Research Methods (OPHRM-62201)

This course introduces students to research methods used in clinical and community-based research, evidence-based practices used to evaluate potential treatment alternatives, and critical evaluation of current published healthcare literature. The course uses lectures, practice exercises and online activities to involve the learner in research proposal development and the interpretation of research performed by others. Assignments assist in learner application and reinforcement of information presented during lecture and the text and articulate knowledge gained in promoting constructive criticism and critical reflection.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Steffie Tomson

Lower Limb Orthotic Management II (OPLOB-64202)

Lower Limb Orthotic Management II (LLO II) covers the comprehensive range of orthotic management of all aspects of the lower limb involving the knee joint and points proximal. This course integrates principles of bracing the lower limb below the knee (LLO I and Pedorthics) as indicated. Bony and muscular anatomy, surface anatomy, kinesiology, weight-bearing strategies, and biometrics relative to the knee and hip and gait are covered in depth. Pathologies and conditions commonly treated with orthoses of the hip and knee are explored, historical orthotic approaches are reviewed, and modern treatment philosophies are covered in depth. Students learn about, observe, and then perform essential aspects of lower limb orthotic care including patient assessment and communication, device design recommendation, measurement and casting, component and material selection, positive model optimization, device fabrication, device application and fitting principles, gait deviation detection and diagnosis, patient device training including shoe wear, device maintenance, and patient follow up.

Credit: 4 semester hours
Course Director: Amandi Rhett

Lower Limb Prosthetic Management II (OPLPB-68202)

The Lower Limb Prosthetic Management II course covers the full scope of practice for the prosthetic management of individuals with unilateral and bilateral amputations at or proximal to the knee joint. Additionally, the course addresses the management of patients presenting with hip disarticulations and hemipelvectomy amputations. The course covers standard and progressive surgical techniques, pre and post-operative prosthetic management and patient-centered multidisciplinary rehabilitation strategies and considerations for lower limb amputees at or proximal to the knee joint. The course requires accountable patient care including detailed documentation, patient education, outcomes measurement, and goal setting. This process culminates in the creation of prosthetic recommendations, in depth justifications of medical necessity, cross disciplinary treatment plans, and follow up care strategies. The course delves deeply into foundational and progressive interface design principles and mechanics for individuals with amputations at or proximal to the knee joint. The foundations of alignment progressions (bench, static, and dynamic), gait deviation analysis and biomechanics are addressed and performed. Thorough coverage and practice of the management of gait deviations through alignment and modifications of interface mechanics are performed throughout the course.

Credit: 8 semester hours
Course Director: Jeremy Sherman

Physical Examination II (OPPEB-62202)

Physical Examination II continues instruction of detailed Range of Motion and Manual Muscle Testing (ROM/MMT) of the complete lower limb and assessment for such. It continues with physical exam concepts applied to orthotic and/or prosthetic care and distributed with the corresponding “core” orthotic and prosthetic courses.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Ashley Mullen

Spinal & Cranial Orthotic Management (OPSCO-66201)

Spinal & Cranial Orthotic Management (SCOM) covers a comprehensive range of orthotic management of the head and all spinal levels. Examples of devices include orthoses for the cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and sacral levels, alone and in combinations, cranial molding helmets, and face masks. Bony and muscle anatomy, surface anatomy, kinesiology, and biometrics relative to the spine and head are covered in depth. Pathologies and conditions commonly treated with spinal orthoses are explored, historical orthotic approaches are reviewed, and modern treatment philosophies are covered in depth. Students learn about, observe, and then perform essential aspects of spinal and cranial orthotic care including patient assessment and communication, device design recommendation, measurement and casting, component and material selection, positive model optimization, device fabrication, device application and fitting principles, patient device training, device maintenance, and patient follow up. Importance of proper patient adherence to prescribed protocols is highlighted.

Credit: 6 semester hours
Course Director: Amandi Rhett

Transition to Practice (OPTTP-63201)

Transition to Practice (TTP) is designed to provide directed, pre-clinical training to students during the didactic year in order to ensure proper achievement of baseline clinical competencies prior to entering the clinical phase of their training. The course involves practical assessments, including a series of sequenced, graded clinical interactions designed to develop clinical skills related to: patient interaction and bed side manner, proper physical assessment, interviewing skills, formulation of a treatment plan, proper follow-up, ethical care, and adherence to sound social and business practices. Although graded assessments occur throughout the coursework, this course culminates in an Objective Skill Clinical Examination, or OSCE. The OSCE is a high-stakes exam that assess each of the basic competencies through a series of simulated clinical experiences.

Credit: 3 semester hours
Course Director: Ashley Mullen

Upper Limb Prosthetic Management (OPULP-68201)

The Upper Limb Prosthetic Management (ULP) course comprehensively covers the full scope of practice for the prosthetic management of individuals with unilateral and bilateral amputations at any level of the upper limb. The course covers standard and progressive surgical techniques, pre- and post-operative prosthetic management and patient-centered multidisciplinary rehabilitation strategies and considerations for upper limb amputees. The course requires accountable patient care including detailed documentation, patient education, outcomes measurement, and goal setting. This process culminates in the creation of prosthetic recommendations, in-depth justifications of medical necessity, cross-disciplinary treatment plans, and follow up care strategies. The course delves into foundational and progressive interface design principles and mechanics, foundations of cable-actuated, myoelectric, and hybrid control strategies and functional harnessing.  EMG-site testing and training IS performed at amputations levels proximal and distal to the elbow.

Credit: 8 semester hours
Course Director: Jeremy Sherman

Dual Residency Curriculum

Clinical Rotation I (OPCRA-78101)

Clinical Rotation I is the first, four-month clinical rotation in the completion of the dual, 18-month O&P residency. Residents work with clinical preceptors and the clinical coordinator to ensure development of skills, appropriate direct and indirect supervision, completion of all of the NCOPE residency competencies, and any patient exposure required to round out the residency experience. Residents are required to submit case logs representing their experience at the clinical site and keep in contact with the clinical coordinator. Residents are assessed according to NCOPE evaluation forms submitted by the clinical preceptors as well as by BCM faculty. This rotation emphasizes the development of technical competency.

Credit: 8 semester hours
Course Director: Sally DiBello

Clinical Seminar I (OPCSA-72101)

Clinical Seminar I is a distance education course which begins with revisiting the characterization and classification of materials in general. It then explores the materials specifically used in the construction of both common and advanced orthotic and prosthetic devices, both custom-fabricated and pre-fabricated, and strategies of selecting from among choices for individual clinical applications. Classifications and properties of metals, plastics, foams, leather, and other materials are reviewed and linked to direct applications in devices and components in O&P. Choices for material properties are compared and contrasted. Numerous clinical and technical applications are exemplified throughout the course.

Credit: 2 semester hour
Course Director: Jared Howell

O&P Research I (OPORA-62101)

O&P Research I (OPR I) continues the efforts from Health Research Methods for O&P on developing and executing the research project. Students are expected to work with their research advisor(s) to independently organize research planning, data collection, data analysis, and manuscript preparations. Progress checks and group discussions about research topics and projects are held periodically through virtual means. Critiques by fellow students and instructors / mentors are performed, resulting in direct feedback for each project. Students submit the required deliverables of the project and discuss project progress with advisors and current and adjacent class cohorts at specified times.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Steffie Tomson

Clinical Rotation II (OPCRB-78102)

Clinical Rotation II is the second, four-month clinical rotation in the completion of the dual, 18-month O&P residency. Residents work with clinical preceptors and the clinical coordinator to ensure development of skills, appropriate direct and indirect supervision, completion of the NCOPE residency competencies, and any patient exposure required to round out the residency experience. Residents are required to submit case logs representing their experience at the clinical site and keep in contact with the clinical coordinator. Residents are assessed according to NCOPE evaluation forms submitted by the clinical preceptors as well as by BCM faculty.

Credit: 8 semester hours
Course Director: Sally DiBello

Clinical Seminar II (OPCSB-72102)

Clinical Seminar II is a distance education course which revisits the Health Behavior Counseling course and includes a Clinical Application of Health Behavioral Counseling techniques.  The course will cover practical strategies to address patient goals, patient adherence, collaborative teamwork, and communication strategies.  The course will involve case studies and discussions centered around the application of motivational interviewing and other counseling strategies pertinent to orthotic and prosthetic treatment interventions.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Directors: Beth Garland and Fanny Schultea

O&P Research II (OPORB-62202)

O&P Research II continues efforts from OPR I on the individual research projects. Students are expected to work with their research advisor(s) to independently organize research planning, data collection, data analysis, and manuscript preparations. Progress checks and group discussions about research topics and projects are held periodically through virtual means. Critiques by fellow students and instructors / mentors are performed, resulting in direct feedback for each project. Students submit the required deliverables of the project and discuss project progress with advisors and current and adjacent class cohorts at specified times.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Steffie Tomson

Clinical Rotation III (OPCRC-78203)

Clinical Rotation III is the third, 4-month clinical rotation in the completion of the dual, 18-month O&P residency. Residents work with clinical preceptors and the clinical coordinator to ensure development of skills, appropriate direct and indirect supervision, completion of the NCOPE residency competencies, and any patient exposure required to round out the residency experience. Residents are required to submit case logs representing their experience at the clinical site and keep in contact with the clinical coordinator. Residents are assessed according to NCOPE evaluation forms submitted by the clinical preceptors as well as by BCM faculty.

Credit: 8 semester hours
Course Director: Sally DiBello

Clinical Seminar III (OPCSC-72203)

Clinical Seminar III is a distance education course designed focusing on the development of ethical principles and standards in the practice of orthotics and prosthetics. It has emphasis in case-based scenarios and discussion groups to effectively teach and model ethical principles. This course features lectures and discussion, and works through a variety of ethical situations through the lens of practice management and patient care.  Regulations relating to scope of practice and insurance and billing requirements are discussed.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Fanny Schultea

O&P Research III (OPORC-62103)

O&P Research III contains the last milestones of the research project, including creation, polishing, and presenting posters and written manuscripts. This class meets periodically when students present their work to each other and faculty for critique. Upon approval by their Research Advisor, students prepare posters of their projects to display at the annual Health Professions Research Day attended by numerous members of multiple health care professions from around the region. Final master’s papers are also due in this course.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Steffie Tomson

Clinical Rotation IV (OPCRD-76104)

Clinical Rotation IV is the fourth clinical rotation in the completion of the dual, 18-month O&P residency, and is three months in length. Residents work with clinical preceptors and the clinical coordinator to ensure development of skills, direct and indirect supervision as deemed appropriate, completion of the NCOPE residency competencies, and any patient exposure required to round out the residency experience. Residents are required to submit case logs representing their experience at the clinical site and keep in contact with the clinical coordinator. Residents are assessed according to NCOPE evaluation forms submitted by the clinical preceptors as well as by BCM faculty.

Credit: 6 semester hours
Course Director: Sally DiBello

Clinical Seminar IV (OPCSD-71104)

Clinical Seminar IV is a distance education course in which students will apply modern administrative and documentation principles related to the provision of comprehensive prosthetic and orthotic care. It introduces students to professional issues related to contemporary clinical practice and exposes them to proper terminology for use in healthcare. Students demonstrate proper techniques and develop competence in coding, justification, and development of the clinical chart. Practice and business management topics and resources are addressed in this course.

Credit: 1 semester hour
Course Director: Jared Howell

Clinical Rotation V (OPCRE-76105)

Clinical Rotation V is the final clinical rotation in the completion of the dual 18-month OP residency and is three months in length. Residents work with clinical preceptors and the clinical coordinator to ensure development of skills, direct and indirect supervision as deemed appropriate, completion of the NCOPE residency competencies, and any patient exposure required to round out the residency experience. Residents are required to submit case logs representing their experience at the clinical site and keep in contact with the clinical coordinator. Residents are assessed according to NCOPE evaluation forms submitted by the clinical preceptors as well as by BCM faculty.

Credit: 6 semester hours
Course Director: Sally DiBello

Clinical Seminar V (OPCSE-71105)

Clinical Seminar V is a 1-credit hour, distance-learning course designed to run concurrently with Clinical Rotation V. This seminar focuses on comprehensive orthotics and prosthetics assessment in preparation for the board exams. Students will participate in a series of reviews related to core orthotic and prosthetic courses.  The final product in this course will be a review packet which will guide the students in preparation for their American Board for Certification Exams.

Credit: 1 semester hour
Course Director: Ashley Mullen

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