School of Health Professions

Course Descriptions

Master
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Anatomical Sciences for O&P (OPANA-62101)

Anatomical Sciences for O & P is designed to provide the student an extensive background in the fundamentals of human anatomy. The course is presented in lecture, small group laboratory, and independent study format. Anatomic structures are reviewed in lecture. The student is then expected to locate, identify and explain the function and relationships of structures using cadavers, prosections, radiograph images, and static models. The course is structured to provide an anatomical basis for understanding the physical examination and structural changes associated with illness and injury of each major organ and body system.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Ming Zhang

Biomechanics I (OPBMA-62101)

The study of normal human movement, performance and function through the application of biomechanical and motor control principles with emphasis on joints, moments, and ground reaction forces. Strategies include methods to study normal and pathological movements via gait analysis; the action and effects of external and internal forces on the musculoskeletal system; the body structure/function changes due to over-, under-, and non-use of body segments; and the influence of orthotic/prosthetic devices on skin integrity, muscular tissue, bone growth, posture, balance and mobility. Biomechanics Fundamentals introduces the study and practice of evaluating and quantifying normal human movement as it relates to activities of daily living. Approaches to the study of biomechanics include gross movements of the human body, musculoskeletal, and neuromuscular considerations for human movement, dynamic force distribution, materials behavior, and lever arms. Skills pertaining to goniometric observations and concepts of linear and angular kinematic and kinetic calculations are introduced. Biomechanics Fundamentals is part one of a two-part course spanning two semesters. Biomechanics Fundamentals begins with an introduction to biomechanics as a discipline and explores application to human movements. Functional anatomy of the spinal column, upper limb, and lower limb are covered with considerations given to orthotic and prosthetic clinical application. Students will be exposed to a variety of techniques for motion analysis including but not limited to: visual analysis, video analysis, and introduction to Zeno Walkway by Protokinetics.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Sally DiBello

Biomechanics II (OPBMB-62202)

Biomechanics continues the study and practice of evaluating and quantifying human movement through simple and complex means begun in Biomechanics I. Established, “low-tech,” clinically-relevant measures and clinical outcomes instruments that individual practitioners may perform on a regular basis with minimum initial investment begin this course. Both quantitative and qualitative varieties are explored, including surveys. Students also gain experience evaluating novel instruments not yet validated for use in O&P. Biomechanical principles and clinical O&P concepts are applied to gait / movement studies of moderate- to high-tech approaches, up to and including fully-equipped motion-analysis laboratory. Application of fundamental biomechanical principles to clinical practice is accomplished through presentation of clinical scenarios and corresponding biomechanical rationales for orthotic and/or prosthetic intervention.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Ashley Mullen

Clinical Practice Management I (OPCPA-62101)

This course is designed to introduce students to concepts that are second- and third-order removed from direct provision prosthetics and orthotics services for patients. Clinical documentation is covered in great detail, as are Letters of Medical Necessity (LMN’s), with examples for source materials for both types of documentation being drawn from concurrent core O&P course projects. While each core O&P course covers coding concepts relative to that practice area, CPM I covers the historical derivation of L-Codes, which Federal governmental agencies perpetuate them and how, and how they are maintained, updated, and/or augmented over time. Finally, Clinical Outcome Measures are also introduced to complement direct provision of clinical services and to provide content for the other types of documentation provided. These concepts are built upon and otherwise deepened with CPM II in the subsequent Spring 1 semester.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Fanny Schultea

Clinical Practice Management II (OPPMB-62201)

This course conveys and applies modern administrative and documentation principles related to the provision of comprehensive prosthetic and orthotic care. It introduces students to professional issues related to contemporary clinical practice and exposes them to proper terminology for use in the medical and healthcare field. Students demonstrate proper techniques and develop competence in coding, justification, and in the development of the clinical chart. Practice and business management topics and resources are also addressed in this course as well as an introduction and framework for addressing ethical concerns that arise as part of clinical care and business practice in the orthotics and prosthetics profession.

Credit: 2 semester hour
Course Director: Jared Howell

Clinical Rotation I (OPCRA-78101)

Clinical Rotation I is the first four-month clinical rotation in the completion of the dual 18-month OP residency. Residents will work with clinical preceptors and the clinical coordinator to ensure development of skills, direct and indirect supervision as deemed appropriate, completion of the NCOPE residency competencies, and any patient exposure required to round out the residency experience. Residents will be required to submit case logs representing their experience at the clinical site and keep in contact with the clinical coordinator. Residents will be assessed according to NCOPE evaluation form submitted by the clinical preceptors. This rotation will emphasize the development of technical competency.

Credit: 8 semester hours
Course Director: Ashley Mullen

Clinical Rotation II (OPCRB-78102)

Clinical Rotation II is the second four-month clinical rotation in the completion of the dual 18-month OP residency. Residents will work with clinical preceptors and the clinical coordinator to ensure development of skills, direct and indirect supervision as deemed appropriate, completion of the NCOPE residency competencies, and any patient exposure required to round out the residency experience. Residents will be required to submit case logs representing their experience at the clinical site and keep in contact with the clinical coordinator. Residents will be assessed according to NCOPE evaluation form submitted by the clinical preceptors.

Credit: 8 semester hours
Course Director: Ashley Mullen

Clinical Rotation III (OPCRC-78203)

Clinical Rotation III is the third, 4-month clinical rotation in the completion of the dual, 18-month OP residency. Residents will work with clinical preceptors and the clinical coordinator to ensure development of skills, direct and indirect supervision as deemed appropriate, completion of the NCOPE residency competencies, and any patient exposure required to round out the residency experience. Residents will be required to submit case logs representing their experience at the clinical site and keep in contact with the clinical coordinator. Residents will be assessed according to NCOPE evaluation form submitted by the clinical preceptors.

Credit: 8 semester hours
Course Director: Ashley Mullen

Clinical Rotation IV (OPCRD-76104)

Clinical Rotation IV is the fourth clinical rotation in the completion of the dual 18-month OP residency. Residents will work with clinical preceptors and the clinical coordinator to ensure development of skills, direct and indirect supervision as deemed appropriate, completion of the NCOPE residency competencies, and any patient exposure required to round out the residency experience. Residents will be required to submit case logs representing their experience at the clinical site and keep in contact with the clinical coordinator. Residents will be assessed according to NCOPE evaluation form submitted by the clinical preceptors.

Credit: 6 semester hours
Course Director: Ashley Mullen

Clinical Rotation V (OPCRE-76105)

Clinical Rotation V is the final clinical rotation in the completion of the dual 18-month OP residency. Residents will work with clinical preceptors and the clinical coordinator to ensure development of skills, direct and indirect supervision as deemed appropriate, completion of the NCOPE residency competencies, and any patient exposure required to round out the residency experience. Residents will be required to submit case logs representing their experience at the clinical site and keep in contact with the clinical coordinator. Residents will be assessed according to NCOPE evaluation form submitted by the clinical preceptors.

Credit: 6 semester hours
Course Director: Ashley Mullen

Clinical Seminar I (OPCSA-71101)

Clinical Seminar I is a 1-credit hour, distance-learning course designed to run concurrently with Clinical Rotation I. This seminar will focus on reviewing foundational principles and introducing advanced clinical practice of lower limb prosthetics. The Clinical Seminars series meets bi-weekly via ZOOM Meeting and/or other web-based, synchronous platforms. In addition to exploring student perspectives on transitioning to residency phase from the classroom, and addressing any concerns voiced by students, faculty-moderated presentations and discussions are led regarding exposure to and acquisition of technical skills within field-based experiences. Guest speakers may present from anywhere online access is granted, and current events and/or routine Program matters are also reviewed with the students.

Credit: 1 semester hour
Course Director: Ashley Mullen

Clinical Seminar II (OPCSB-71102)

Clinical Seminar II is a 1-credit hour, distance-learning course designed to run concurrently with Clinical Rotation II . This seminar will focus on reviewing foundational principles and introducing advanced clinical practice of upper limb prosthetics and spinal orthotics. The Clinical Seminars series meets bi-weekly via ZOOM Meeting and/or other web-based, synchronous platforms. In addition to exploring student perspectives on transitioning to residency phase from the classroom, and addressing any concerns voiced by students, faculty-moderated presentations and discussions are led regarding exposure to and acquisition of technical skills within field-based experiences. Guest speakers may present from anywhere online access is granted, and current events and/or routine Program matters are also reviewed with the students.

Credit: 1 semester hour
Course Director: Ashley Mullen

Clinical Seminar III (OPCSC-71203)

Clinical Seminar III is a 1-credit hour, distance-learning course designed to run concurrently with Clinical Rotation III . This seminar will focus on reviewing foundational principles and introducing advanced clinical practice of lower limb Orthotics. The Clinical Seminars series meets bi-weekly via ZOOM Meeting and/or other web-based, synchronous platforms. In addition to exploring student perspectives on transitioning to residency phase from the classroom, and addressing any concerns voiced by students, faculty-moderated presentations and discussions are led regarding exposure to and acquisition of technical skills within field-based experiences. Guest speakers may present from anywhere online access is granted, and current events and/or routine Program matters are also reviewed with the students.

Credit: 1 semester hour
Course Director: Ashley Mullen

Clinical Seminar IV (OPCSD-71104)

Clinical Seminar IV is a 1-credit hour, distance-learning course designed to run concurrently with Clinical Rotation I V. This seminar will focus on preparation for navigating a career in orthotics and prosthetics with an appreciation for leadership and lifelong learning. The Clinical Seminars series meets bi-weekly via ZOOM Meeting and/or other web-based, synchronous platforms. In addition to exploring student perspectives on transitioning to residency phase from the classroom, and addressing any concerns voiced by students, faculty-moderated presentations and discussions are led regarding exposure to and acquisition of technical skills within field-based experiences. Guest speakers may present from anywhere online access is granted, and current events and/or routine Program matters are also reviewed with the students.

Credit: 1 semester hour
Course Director: Ashley Mullen

Clinical Seminar V (OPCSE-71105)

Clinical Seminar V is a 1-credit hour, distance-learning course designed to run concurrently with Clinical Rotation V . This seminar will focus on comprehensive orthotics and prosthetics assessment in preparation for the board exams. The Clinical Seminars series meets bi-weekly via ZOOM Meeting and/or other web-based, synchronous platforms. In addition to exploring student perspectives on transitioning to residency phase from the classroom, and addressing any concerns voiced by students, faculty-moderated presentations and discussions are led regarding exposure to and acquisition of technical skills within field-based experiences. Guest speakers may present from anywhere online access is granted, and current events and/or routine Program matters are also reviewed with the students.

Credit: 1 semester hour
Course Director: Ashley Mullen

Cultural Competency (OPCC-61101)

The course introduces students to issues surrounding cultural awareness and sensitivity pertaining to the diversity and uniqueness of populations to be encountered as health care practitioners and elsewhere through lectures, discussions, small group activities, and participation in community events. Specifically, the course explores personal bias, communication styles, belief systems, alternative health care practices, family roles, and the relationship of these issues to perceptions of culture, socioeconomic status, and provision of healthcare.

Credit: 1 semester hour
Course Director: Jonnae Atkinson

Foundations of O&P (OPFOP-63101)

The Foundations of Orthotics and Prosthetics class is designed to provide an introduction to major themes covered throughout the balance of the program. Lab safety, materials selection, technical activities, tool identification and selection, professionalism, Clinical communication, and safety of self and others. The course highlights topics essential to the learning and practice of O&P are emphasized.Foundations focuses on content that is used across core curriculum and is heavily biased to developing entry level competencies and best practices for future coursework in OP program. Concepts learned and skills developed in foundations provide the framework for success in the didactic year, clinical experiences, and professional practice.

Credit: 3 semester hours
Course Director: Jared Howell

Health Behavioral Counseling (HPHBC-62201)

This course explores the theory and practice of counseling for health behavior change with a focus on application of Motivational Interviewing skills to cancer-related and other health-risk behaviors. The stages of behavior change are introduced using the framework of the Transtheoretical Model along with social learning theory. Elements of the therapeutic alliance and the principles of harm reduction are introduced along with socializing the patient to motivational health behavior change counseling. Modeling through role play is used to develop and refine a student’s ability to identify risk, assess readiness for change, and offer messages designed to strengthen the patient’s commitment to change. Observations of self-help and patient support group sessions are used to further socialize students to the degree to which individuals are committed to change. These experiences shall help the student develop an intimate understanding of the process of change and thereby increase empathy for patients attempting to improve their own health behaviors and adhere to challenging treatment regimens.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Beth Garland

Health Research Methods (OPHRM-62201)

This course introduces the participant to research methods used in clinical and community-based research, evidence-based practices used to evaluate potential treatment alternatives, and critical evaluation of current published literature. The course uses lectures, practice exercises and online activities to involve the learner in research proposal development and the interpretation of research performed by others. Assignments assist in learner application and reinforcement of information presented during lecture and the text and articulate knowledge gained promoting constructive criticism and critical reflection.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Melissa Suter

Lower Limb Orthotic Management I (OPLOA-67101)

Lower Limb Orthotic Management I (LLO I) includes orthotic management of all aspects of the lower limb below the knee. Devices explored in depth include the large number of variants of ankle-foot orthoses (AFO’s) used regularly in modern lower-limb, orthotic practice. Bony and muscular anatomy, surface anatomy, muscle physiology, kinesiology, weight-bearing strategies, and biometrics relative to the foot and ankle and gait are covered in depth. Conditions commonly treated with footwear and orthoses of the feet and/or ankles are explored, historical orthotic approaches are reviewed, and modern treatment philosophies are covered in depth. Students learn about, observe, and then perform essential aspects of foot and ankle orthotic care including patient assessment and communication, device design recommendation, measurement and casting, component and material selection, positive model optimization, device fabrication, device application and fitting principles, gait deviation detection and diagnosis, patient device training including shoe wear, device maintenance, and patient follow up.

Credit: 7 semester hours
Course Director: Sally DiBello

Lower Limb Orthotic Management II (OPLOB-64202)

Lower Limb Orthotic Management II (LLO II) covers the comprehensive range of orthotic management of all aspects of the lower limb involving the knee joint and points proximal. This course integrates principles of bracing the lower limb below the knee (LLO I) as indicated. Bony and muscular anatomy, surface anatomy, muscle physiology, kinesiology, weight-bearing strategies, and biometrics relative to the knee and hip and gait are covered in depth. Pathologies and conditions commonly treated with orthoses of the hip and knee are explored, historical orthotic approaches are reviewed, and modern treatment philosophies are covered in depth. Students learn about, observe, and then perform essential aspects of lower limb orthotic care including patient assessment and communication, device design recommendation, measurement and casting, component and material selection, positive model optimization, device fabrication, device application and fitting principles, gait deviation detection and diagnosis, patient device training including shoe wear, device maintenance, and patient follow up.

Credit: 4 semester hours
Course Director: Sally DiBello

Lower Limb Prosthetic Management I (OPLPA-68101)

Lower Limb Prosthetic Management 1 (LLP I) covers a comprehensive range of prosthetic management of amputation levels of the lower limb through the tibia and points distal. Bony and muscular anatomy, surface anatomy, muscle physiology, kinesiology, and biometrics relative to the lower limb are covered in depth. Conditions resulting in lower limb amputation are explored, historical prosthetic approaches to transtibial prosthetics practice are reviewed, and modern transtibial prosthetic devices, components, and philosophies are covered in depth. Students learn about, observe, and then perform essential aspects of transtibial prosthetic care (and points distal) including patient assessment and communication, K-Level evaluation and designation, device design recommendation, measurement and casting, component and material selection, positive model optimization, device fabrication, prosthetic alignment and transfer, device application and fitting principles, gait deviation detection, patient device training, gait considerations, device maintenance, volume management, and patient follow up. LLP I also covers prosthetic feet of all kinds, partial foot management, and bilateral amputee management.

Credit: 8 semester hours
Course Director: Joshua Utay

Lower Limb Prosthetic Management II (OPLPB-68202)

The Lower Limb Prosthetic Management II course comprehensively covers the full scope of practice for the prosthetic management of individuals with unilateral and bilateral amputations at or proximal to the knee joint. Additionally, the course addresses the management of patients presenting with hip disarticulations and hemipelvectomy amputations. The course covers standard and progressive surgical techniques, pre and post-operative prosthetic management and patient-centered multidisciplinary rehabilitation strategies and considerations for lower limb amputees at or proximal to the knee joint. The course requires accountable patient care including detailed documentation, patient education, outcomes measurement, and goal setting. This process culminates in the creation of prosthetic recommendations, in depth justifications of medical necessity, cross disciplinary treatment plans, and follow up care strategies. The course delves deeply into foundational and progressive interface design principles and mechanics for individuals with amputations at or proximal to the knee joint. The foundations of alignment progressions (bench, static, and dynamic), gait deviation analysis and biomechanics are addressed and performed. Thorough coverage and practice of the management of gait deviations through alignment and modifications of interface mechanics are performed throughout the course.

Credit: 8 semester hours
Course Director: Fanny Schultea

Materials Science and Selection in O&P (OPMSS-62102)

Materials Science and Selection for O&P begins with an introduction to the characterization and classification of materials in general. It then explores the materials specifically used in the construction of orthotic and prosthetic devices, both custom and pre-fabricated, and strategies of selecting from among them for specific clinical uses. Classifications and properties of metals, plastics, foams, leather, and other materials are introduced and linked to direct applications in devices and components in O & P. Choices for material properties are compared and contrasted. Numerous clinical and technical applications are exemplified throughout the course.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Jared Howell

Medical Ethics (OPETH-62201)

Medical Ethics course focuses the development of ethical principles and standards in the practice of medicine and other types of healthcare delivery. It has emphasis in case-based scenarios and discussion groups to effectively teach and model ethical principles. This course has three components: (1) lectures, (2) small group sessions, and (3) clinical ethics rounds, and it combines students from multiple disciplines to ensure the fullest breadth and depth of clinical care is covered.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Christi Guerrini

O&P Research I (OPORA-62101)

O&P Research I (OPR I) continues the efforts from Health Research Methods for O&P on developing and executing the research project. Students are expected to work with their research advisor(s) to independently organize research planning, data collection, data analysis, and manuscript preparations. The class is assembled at the mid-point of the semester for progress checks and group discussions about research topics and projects. Critiques by fellow students and instructors / mentors are performed resulting in direct feedback for each project. Students gather again at the end of the semester to submit the required deliverables of the project and discuss project progress with advisors and current and adjacent class cohorts.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Melissa Suter

O & P Research II (OPORB-62202)

O & P Research II continues efforts from OPR I on the individual research projects. Midway through, students present progress on their projects and preliminary results to classmates and mentors. Critiques and suggestions are offered on statistical analyses and results sections by students and faculty. Students individually gather remaining data, compute results, and construct remaining sections with mentors. Students gather one more time at the end of the semester to submit the required elements of the project and for class presentation of project progress to current and adjacent class cohorts.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Melissa Suter

O & P Research III (OPORC-62103)

O & P Research III contains the last milestones of the research project, including creation, polishing, and presenting posters and written manuscripts. This class then meets periodically when students present their work to each other and faculty for critique. Upon approval by their Research Advisor, students prepare posters of their projects to display at the annual Health Professions Research Day in November attended by numerous members of multiple health care professions from around the region. Final master’s papers are due by the end of the semester.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Melissa Suter

Pathophysiology for O & P (OPPAT-62101)

Pathophysiology for O & P introduces to students the clinical procedures, conditions, and sequelae an orthotist/prosthetist evaluates and addresses most regularly. Conditions are introduced in groups organized by body system, body region, and corresponding likely orthotic/prosthetic intervention. This course explores the interrelated physiological links, clinical presentations, and biomechanical goals associated with these conditions illustrating the rationale for general orthotic/prosthetic intervention. Specific O & P treatment indications are explored in the corresponding core orthotic and/or prosthetic course.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Joshua Utay

Pedorthic Management (OPPED-64101)

Pedorthic Management covers orthotic management of the foot and ankle. Devices covered are those distal to the malleoli. Examples of devices include therapeutic shoes, accommodative foot orthoses, functional foot orthoses, and subtalar control foot orthoses (UCBL FO’s). The course provides an overview of custom shoewear, as well as shoe modifications. Bony, muscular, and neurological anatomy is reviewed, along with pathological conditions of the foot and ankle. Foot and lower limb pathologies, kinesiology, gait analysis, and orthotic treatment are explored in depth. Students learn about, observe, and then perform essential aspects of pedorthic management, including patient evaluation and initial assessment, impression taking, device design, positive model modification, material selection, device fitting, device modification, and patient outcome assessment.

Credit: 4 semester hours
Course Director: Ashley Mullen

Physical Examination I (OPPEA-62101)

Physical Examination (PE) explores the full scope of a physical bodily exam in the context of the evaluation for and provision of clinical O&P services. Physical Examination has emphasis on manually determining the range of motion (ROM) and muscle strength (MMT) of major joints in the body with respect to typical presentation and common pathological conditions, inclusive of musculoskeletal, neurological, congenital, and developmental conditions. Students will develop an ability to perform a comprehensive physical examination in order to derive appropriate orthotic or prosthetic interventions.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Ashley Mullen

Physical Examination II (OPPEB-62202)

Physical Examination II begins with instruction of detailed Range of Motion and Manual Muscle Testing (ROM/MMT) of the complete lower limb and assessment for such. It continues with physical exam concepts applied to orthotic and/or prosthetic care and distributed with the corresponding “core” orthotic / prosthetic courses.

Credit: 2 semester hours
Course Director: Ashley Mullen

Spinal & Cranial Orthotic Management (OPSCO-66201)

Spinal & Cranial Orthotic Management covers a comprehensive range of orthotic management of the head and all spinal levels. Examples of devices include orthoses for the cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and sacral levels, alone and in combinations, cranial molding helmets, and face masks. Bony and muscle anatomy, surface anatomy, muscle physiology, kinesiology, and biometrics relative to the spine and head are covered in depth. Pathologies and conditions commonly treated with spinal orthoses are explored, historical orthotic approaches are reviewed, and modern treatment philosophies are covered in depth. Students learn about, observe, and then perform essential aspects of spinal and cranial orthotic care including patient assessment and communication, device design recommendation, measurement and casting, component and material selection, positive model optimization, device fabrication, device application and fitting principles, patient device training, device maintenance, and patient follow up. Importance of proper patient compliance is highlighted.

Credit: 6 semester hours
Course Director: Joshua Utay

Transition to Practice (OPTTP-63201)

This course is designed to provide directed, pre-clinical training to students during the didactic year in order to ensure proper achievement of baseline clinical competencies prior to entering the clinical phase of their training. The course is a practical assessment course which includes a series of sequenced, graded clinical interactions designed to develop clinical skills related to: patient interaction and bed side manner, proper physical assessment, interviewing skills, formulation of a treatment plan, proper follow-up, ethical care, and adherence to sound social and business practices. Although graded assessments occur throughout the coursework, this course culminates in an Objective Skill Clinical Examination, or OSCE. The OSCE is a high-stakes exam that assess each of the basic competencies through a series of simulated clinical experiences. OSCE exams are video-recorded through simulation laboratories allowing students the opportunity to view their own interactions and learn from the experiences.

Credit: 3 semester hours
Course Director: Jared Howell

Upper Limb Orthotic Management (OPULO-64101)

Upper Limb Orthotic Management covers a comprehensive range of orthotic management of all aspects of the upper limb. Examples of devices include orthoses for the shoulder, elbow, forearm, wrist, hand, thumb, and fingers. Bony and muscular anatomy, surface anatomy, muscle physiology, kinesiology, and biometrics relative to the upper limb are reviewed, and conditions commonly treated with upper limb orthoses are explored alongside their corresponding historical and contemporary approaches to orthotic intervention. Students learn about, observe, and then perform essential aspects of upper limb orthotic care including: patient assessment and communication, device design recommendation, measurement and casting, component and material selection, positive model optimization, device fabrication, device application and fitting principles, patient device training, device maintenance, and patient follow up.

Credit: 4 semester hours
Course Director: Joshua Utay

Upper Limb Prosthetic Management (OPULP-68201)

The Upper Limb Prosthetic Management course comprehensively covers the full scope of practice for the prosthetic management of individuals with unilateral and bilateral amputations proximal and distal to the elbow joint. Additionally, the course addresses the management of patients presenting with partial hand, shoulder disarticulation and interscapulothoracic amputations. The course covers standard and progressive surgical techniques, pre and post-operative prosthetic management and patient-centered multidisciplinary rehabilitation strategies and considerations for upper limb amputees. The course requires accountable patient care including detailed documentation, patient education, outcomes measurement, and goal setting. This process culminates in the creation of prosthetic recommendations, in depth justifications of medical necessity, cross disciplinary treatment plans, and follow up care strategies. The course delves into foundational and progressive interface design principles and mechanics; foundations of cable actuated, myoelectric, and hybrid control strategies; functional harnessing, EMG site testing and training will be performed at amputations levels proximal and distal to the elbow.

Credit: 8 semester hours
Course Director: Fanny Schultea

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Orthotics and Prosthetics Program

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One Baylor Plaza, MS: BCM115
Houston, TX 77030
Phone: (713) 798-3098
Fax: (713) 798-7694

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