!

COVID-19 Response 

Access our COVID-19 Response homepage, with more information and resources during the COVID-19 pandemic, including what to do if you’re experiencing symptoms.

Department of Neuroscience

News

Master
Heading

Neuroscience in the News : 2019

Terms

Peter Saggau Appointed Emeritus Professor

Item Definition

Dr. Peter Saggau has been appointed as an Emeritus Professor in the Department of Neuroscience at Baylor College of Medicine. 

Dr. Matthew Rasband recognized for outstanding mentorship

Item Definition

Dr. Matthew N. Rasband, professor, and Vivian L. Smith Endowed Chair in Neuroscience at Baylor College of Medicine, has been awarded the Landis Award for Outstanding Mentorship.

Dr. Joanna Jankowsky receives Alzheimer’s Association grant

Item Definition

Dr. Joanna Jankowsky has been awarded a Zenith Fellows research grant, which supports scientists who have contributed significantly to the Alzheimer's disease research field.

Microbial-based treatment reverses social deficits in mouse models of autism

Item Definition

An unconventional bacteria-based approach has successfully reversed deficits in social behaviors associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in genetic, environmental, and idiopathic mouse models of the condition.

Heading

Neuroscience in the News : 2018

Terms

Sept. 4, 2018: Image of the Month: Neurons in the retina 

Item Definition

In her lab, Dr. Samuel investigates neural wiring pathways and molecules involved in helping neurons make the right connections with other neurons for normal neural function.

Aug. 23, 2018: Pay attention to the ‘noise’ in your brain 

Item Definition

In a recent study, Dr. George Denfield and his colleagues found evidence that variability can be attributed to fluctuations in internally generated signals like attention, so that the more one’s attention is split, the “noisier” the neuronal responses appear to be from the outside.

Feb. 21, 2018 : MIT Technology Review: A Less-Artificial Intelligence

Item Definition

A fair number of engineers working on artificial intelligence don’t care whether their systems resemble real brains or not, as long as they perform well. But even today’s best systems can generalize only if fed thousands of samples, and they can’t transfer their generalizations to new contexts. This leaves AI vulnerable to attackers, who can trick it with tiny tweaks to the data. Neuroscientist Andreas Tolias believes that brain-like features could fix these problems.

Back to topback-to-top