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Research

RNA In Situ Hybridization Core

Master
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About the Core

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This core performs non-radioactive, RNA in situ hybridization (ISH) on tissue sections. A unique high-throughput technology developed by the core (Yaylaoglu MB, Titmus A, Visel A, Alvarez-Bolado G, Thaller C, Eichele G. Dev Dyn. 2005 Oct;234(2):371-86) is used to determine gene expression patterns with an emphasis on tissues from rodent experimental models.

The core provides a full range of services including: collecting animal tissue specimens, preparation of frozen and paraffin sections, preparation of RNA probes from customer templates, conducting high-throughput ISH, and documentation and quantification of expression patterns by microscopy. We also do X-gal and Cresyl Violet staining on sections. For human studies, customers must provide tissue sections.

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Acknowledgments (Additional Information)

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All users: We ask that you please acknowledge the support given to your research with the following statement: “This project was supported by the RNA In Situ Hybridization Core at Baylor College of Medicine, which is, in part, supported by a Shared Instrumentation grant from the NIH (S10OD016167).”

IDDRC members: We ask that all Intellectual and Developmental Disease Research Center users acknowledge the core as follows:

"The project described was supported in part by the RNA In Situ Hybridization Core facility at Baylor College of Medicine, which is supported by a Shared Instrumentation grant from the NIH (S10OD016167) and the NIH IDDRC grant U54HD083092 from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute Of Child Health & Human Development. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute Of Child Health & Human Development or the National Institutes of Health.”

DDC members: We ask all Texas Medical Center Digestive Diseases Center users that used the core prior to March 2022 to acknowledge the core as follows:

"The project described was supported in part by the RNA In Situ Hybridization Core facility at Baylor College of Medicine, which is supported by a Shared Instrumentation grant from the NIH (S10OD016167) and the PHS grant DK056338.”

A copy of your publication would also be greatly appreciated.

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