About Us

This core performs non-radioactive, RNA in situ hybridization (ISH) on tissue sections. A unique high-throughput technology developed by the core (Yaylaoglu MB, Titmus A, Visel A, Alvarez-Bolado G, Thaller C, Eichele G. Dev Dyn. 2005 Oct;234(2):371-86) is used to determine gene expression patterns with an emphasis on tissues from rodent experimental models.

The core provides a full range of services including: collecting animal tissue specimens, preparation of frozen and paraffin sections, preparation of RNA probes from customer templates, conducting high-throughput ISH, and documentation and quantification of expression patterns by microscopy. We also do X-gal and Cresyl Violet staining on sections. For human studies, customers must provide tissue sections.

Acknowledgments

All users: We ask that you please acknowledge the support given to your research with the following statement: “This project was supported by the RNA In Situ Hybridization Core at Baylor College of Medicine, which is, in part, supported by a Shared Instrumentation grant from the NIH (1S10OD016167).”

IDDRC members: We ask that all Intellectual and Developmental Disease Research Center users acknowledge the core as follows:

"The project described was supported in part by the RNA In Situ Hybridization Core facility at Baylor College of Medicine, which is supported by a Shared Instrumentation grant from the NIH (1S10OD016167) and the NIH IDDRC grant U54HD083092 from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute Of Child Health & Human Development. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute Of Child Health & Human Development or the National Institutes of Health.”

DDC members: We ask all Texas Medical Center Digestive Diseases Center users to acknowledge the core as follows:

"The project described was supported in part by the RNA In Situ Hybridization Core facility at Baylor College of Medicine, which is supported by a Shared Instrumentation grant from the NIH (1S10OD016167) and the PHS grant DK56338.”

A copy of your publication would also be greatly appreciated.