Infectious Diseases News

Experts say 2017-2018 flu season could be severeSep 13, 2017
Beginning this fall, it’s important to get vaccinated soon against influenza, according to Dr. Robert Atmar.
Hookworms, poverty, poor sanitation linked in rural AlabamaSep 6, 2017
Problems with poor sanitation linked to extreme poverty also have resulted in a recurrence or persistence of hookworm infection in rural areas of Alabama
Health concerns after Harvey Sep 1, 2017
Doctors at Baylor College of Medicine want to keep health setbacks from compounding the misfortune of storm evacuees.
What you need to know about flea and tick bites this summerJun 26, 2017
Infectious diseases expert Dr. Laila Woc-Colburn tells you what you need to know this flea and tick season.
Researchers to study neurological effects of Zika in childrenJun 19, 2017
The Vaccine Treatment and Evaluation Unit (VTEU) at Baylor College of Medicine has received funding to conduct an observational study on the neurologic and neurodevelopmental effects of Zika virus among children who are infected in early childhood.
Chikungunya vaccine trial underway at BaylorJun 5, 2017
The National Institutes of Health-funded Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit at Baylor will be one of the sites for a clinical trial testing the safety and immune responses to a vaccine against chikungunya virus.
As temperatures rise, so does threat of Zika virusApr 26, 2017
In light of the current Zika epidemic, experts tell you what you need to be aware of this mosquito season.
When to see a doctor for the flu Feb 27, 2017
Dr. Carmen Robinson says to make an appointment immediately if you have flu-like symptoms such as a fever, sore throat, cough, body aches, chills and fatigue or weakness.
Center for Medical Ethics awarded grant for Zika policy toolkitFeb 22, 2017
The Texas Medical Center has awarded the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy a grant to develop policymaking strategies focused on Zika.
Researchers find Zika virus replicates in placental trophoblastsJan 27, 2017
Findings lend hope to the possibility that care providers could use existing prenatal diagnostic techniques to detect the Zika virus and find a way to stop its spread to the fetus.