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Baylor College of Medicine News

Flu Central

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Prevent the spread of the flu virus

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In an average year, influenza activity begins in late November or early December, peaks in January or February and leaves around April or early May. However, if there is anything we have learned from previous years, it’s that flu season is unpredictable. Getting your flu shot now offers the best protection for the entire season.

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Why Should You be Vaccinated?

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The influenza virus can cause serious complications and even death. The virus can have serious complications in children, the elderly and those who are immunocompromised. Universal immunization is the best way to protect everybody against the flu. The more people who are protected, the less likely that an influenza season will be able to take hold or cause complications. Pregnant women will transfer antibodies from the vaccine through the placenta to their infant, and the baby will then be passively protected from the influenza virus during their first six months of life.

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Who Should Get Which Vaccine?

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  • Healthy individuals 6 months of age or older can receive the flu shot.
  • Individuals over the age of 65 should get the higher dose influenza vaccine, which contains four times the concentration of the regular influenza vaccine and produces a better immune response in this age group.
  • Pregnant women can receive the flu shot during any trimester.
  • Anyone working in the healthcare environment should be protected against the flu to reduce the risk of spreading it to others who would be susceptible in a high-risk setting such as a hospital.

Learn how Baylor Medicine protects its employees, patients and the community.

Protecting Our Community
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Are There Any Exceptions as to Who Should Be Vaccinated?

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  • Those with a severe egg allergy should not receive an egg-based influenza vaccine, but should speak to their physician about receiving a cell-based influenza vaccine.
  • Individuals with Guillain-Barre Syndrome should speak with their physicians to weigh the risk versus the benefit of getting the influenza vaccine.
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When Should You Get the Vaccine?

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Don’t wait until the flu season is here to get vaccinated because it reduces the time that the vaccine can provide protection during the flu season. The vaccine takes about one to two weeks to give full protection against the virus.

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What About Kids?

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Children should be vaccinated against the virus for their own protection and because it is known that school-aged children are likely to spread the infection to others in the community. Infants and children 8 years and younger who have never been previously vaccinated will need a second dose four weeks after the first dose.

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What Should I Do If I Think I Have the Flu?

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Most people with the flu have mild illness and do not need medical care or antiviral drugs. If you get sick with flu symptoms, in most cases, you should stay home and avoid contact with other people except to get medical care. If, however, you have symptoms of flu and are in a high risk group, or are very sick or worried about your illness, contact your Baylor doctor or other healthcare provider. Your doctor may prescribe antiviral drugs that can treat the flu. These drugs work better for treatment the sooner they are started.

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Additional Resources

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Weekly Report

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Check out the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention weekly influenza update.

Influenza Molecular Virology and Microbiology

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Learn all about molecular virology and microbiology of the influenza virus from our experts at Baylor College of Medicine.

Methods of Vaccinations

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There is a variety of ways to be vaccinated, learn what might work best for you. 

COVID-19 and the Flu

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What to do to lower your risk of contracting two potentially deadly viruses - COVID-19 and the flu.