Williams syndrome is a developmental disorder that can affect the body in a variety of ways, from influencing intellectual development and cardiovascular function to altering personality traits and facial features. On Tuesday, May 7, Evenings with Genetics, a monthly speaker series hosted by Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital, will highlight Williams syndrome and how teens with the condition can develop independence as adults.

Dr. Lorraine Potocki, professor of molecular and human genetics at Baylor, and Dr. Jordan Kemere, assistant professor of medicine-transition medicine at Baylor, will speak about the latest research and therapies contributing to our understanding of Williams syndrome. Jennifer Latson, author of "The Boy Who Loved Too Much," and Tes Lopez-Rich, South Texas regional coordinator of the Williams Syndrome Association, also will provide their perspectives on the condition.

The Evenings with Genetics series offers current information regarding care, education and research as they relate to genetic disorders and encourages networking within the community by connecting patients and their families with others in similar situations.

“I look forward to discussing the transition from pediatric to adult-based care, a process that takes many years. Teenagers with intellectual and developmental disabilities, including Williams syndrome, can participate more in their healthcare as they age and can often learn how to manage aspects of their own care with support and coaching,” Kemere said.

The program is free and open to the public, but registration is required. The seminar will be held at the Children’s Museum of Houston, 1500 Binz St., 77004. Light refreshments will be provided beginning at 6:30 p.m., and the seminar will begin at 7 p.m. For more information, please call 832-822-4280 or visit the event’s registration page.