Research

Funding Opportunities

Master
Content

Nuclear Organization and Function Interdisciplinary Consortium (NOFIC)(U54)
(RFA-RM-14-006)
NIH Roadmap Initiatives
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
The Common Fund/Office of Strategic Coordination
Application Receipt Date(s): Dec. 16, 2014

Nucleomics Tools (U01)
(RFA-RM-14-007)
NIH Roadmap Initiatives
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
The Common Fund/Office of Strategic Coordination
Application Receipt Date(s): Feb. 2, 2015

Study of Nuclear Bodies and Compartments (U01)
(RFA-RM-14-008)
NIH Roadmap Initiatives
National Institute on Drug Abuse
The Common Fund/Office of Strategic Coordination
Application Receipt Date(s): Feb. 2, 2015

4D Nucleome Imaging Tools (U01)
(RFA-RM-14-009)
NIH Roadmap Initiatives
National Institute on Drug Abuse
The Common Fund/Office of Strategic Coordination
Application Receipt Date(s): Feb. 2, 2015

4D Nucleome Network Organizational Hub (U01)
(RFA-RM-14-010)
NIH Roadmap Initiatives
National Cancer Institute
The Common Fund/Office of Strategic Coordination
Application Receipt Date(s): Dec. 16, 2014

4D Nucleome Network Data Coordination and Integration Center (U01)
(RFA-RM-14-011)
NIH Roadmap Initiatives
National Cancer Institute
The Common Fund/Office of Strategic Coordination
Application Receipt Date(s): Dec. 16, 2014

Content

Evaluation of Multi-omic Data in Understanding the Human Microbiome's Role in Health and Disease (U54)
(RFA-RM-12-021)
The Common Fund/Office of Strategic Coordination
Application Receipt Date(s): Feb. 8, 2013

The Funding Opportunity Application (FOA) for Phase 2 of the Human Microbiome Project has just been released. This FOA, which will be funded by the NIH Common Fund, is soliciting integrated -omic (metagenomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, etc.) studies of the role in human disease of the microbiome resident at any body site. This FOA will be of interest not only to microbiologists, but also to systems biologists, and any clinical investigators who have an interest in adding a microbiome dimension to their clinical studies. The projects being solicited will require a large, well-characterized clinical population, and collaboration between clinical and basic scientists in a broad range of disciplines. As the submission deadline is in early February, we are trying to disseminate this FOA as rapidly as possible to all interested investigators.

Content

Determinants and Consequences of Personalized Health Care and Prevention (U01)
(RFA-RM-12-024)
NIH Roadmap Initiatives
Application Receipt Date(s): Feb. 28, 2013

This FOA solicits U01 applications for economic research on the determinants and consequences of personalization in health care and prevention. The objective of the research program is to support foundational research on economic aspects of individualized health interventions that will provide a framework for subsequent applied analyses. Program director(s)/principal investigator(s) for projects funded under this FOA are required to participate in a Steering Committee that will help identify key strategies to support critical research advances in this field. Research to be supported by this FOA includes analyses and development of research tools to advance understanding of factors that affect the value of personalized interventions to individuals and their families, health care providers and payers, and society at large; incentives and constraints facing individuals and their families, health care providers, research organizations, drug and device manufacturers, and others and how they affect the actual and optimal extent to which interventions are tailored to patients' personal characteristics or preferences; and strategies to promote improvements in health and cost outcomes through personalization of health care and preventive interventions. The purpose of this FOA is to expand generalizable understanding of the determinants and consequences of personalization in health care and prevention; it is not primarily intended to support evaluation of specific interventions or strategies for addressing particular health conditions.

Content

Translational Research to Improve Obesity and Diabetes Outcomes (R18)
(PAR-12-172)
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
Application Receipt Date(s): July 2, 2012 , Nov. 1, 2012 , March 1, 2013, July 1, 2013, Nov. 1, 2013, March 3, 2014, July 1, 2014, Nov. 3, 2014, March 2, 2015

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases encourages NIH Research Demonstration and Dissemination Project grant (R18) applications from institutions/ organizations to test practical, sustainable, acceptable, and cost efficient adaptations of efficacious strategies or approaches prevent and treat diabetes and/or obesity. Research must target the prevention or reversal of obesity, prevention of type 2 diabetes, improved care of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, or the prevention or delay of the complications of these conditions. The approaches tested should have the potential to be widely disseminated to clinical practice, individuals and communities at risk.

Content

Planning Grants for Translational Research to Improve Obesity and Diabetes Outcomes (R34)
(PAR-12-173)
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
National Institute of Mental Health
Application Receipt Date(s): July 2, 2012 , Nov. 1, 2012 , March 1, 2013, July 1, 2013, Nov. 1, 2013, March 3, 2014, July 1, 2014, Nov. 3, 2014, March 2, 2015

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the National Institute of Mental Health encourage NIH Clinical Trial Planning Grant Program grant (R34) applications from institutions/ organizations to develop and pilot test practical, sustainable, acceptable, and cost efficient adaptations of efficacious strategies or approaches prevent and treat diabetes and/or obesity. Research must target the prevention or reversal of obesity, prevention of type 2 diabetes, improved care of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, or the prevention or delay of the complications of these conditions. NIMH encourages research focused on people with severe mental illness (SMI), whose risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes is twice that of the general population. The approaches tested should have the potential to be widely disseminated to clinical practice, individuals and communities at risk.

Content

Bioengineering Interdisciplinary Training for Diabetes Research (T32)
(PAR-13-047)
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
Application Receipt Date(s): March 7, 2013, Nov. 26, 2013

The purpose of this FOA is to promote the development of an interdisciplinary workforce for conducting bioengineering research to develop innovative technologies for treatment of diabetes including creating integrated long term glucose regulated insulin delivery systems (artificial pancreas), beta cell or islet encapsulation for beta cell replacement therapy, wound healing or prevention for diabetic ulcers, better cellular models of relevant tissues for studying diabetes and its complications and/or beta cell and autoimmunity imaging methods. This FOA will support institutional training programs in diabetes research for pre and postdoctoral level researchers with backgrounds in bioengineering and/or computational sciences.

This FOA is intended to train the next generation of scientists with bioengineering expertise and the necessary interdisciplinary skills to foster development of innovative technologies for prevention, treatment and cure of diabetes and its complications. These technologies could include: 1) an integrated, long term, automated glucose regulated insulin delivery system (artificial pancreas); 2: improved formulations of insulin; 3) beta cell replacement or renewal therapies; 4) imaging technologies to monitor beta cell mass/function and/or autoimmunity to facilitate clinical research on approaches to replace or preserve beta cells; 5) bioengineered matrixes for diabetic wound healing; 6) better cellular models of relevant tissues for studying diabetes and its complications; or 7) other application of bioengineering to the understanding, diagnosis, treatment or cure for diabetes. NIDDK is particularly interested in supporting the participation of individual trainees with backgrounds in engineering, or computational and physical sciences in high quality interdisciplinary programs in diabetes research. This FOA is part of a larger special effort to improve approaches to prevent, treat and cure diabetes.

Any questions related to the funding opportunity (which has two application receipt dates) should be directed to:

Arthur L. Castle, Ph.D.
Program Director, Metabolomics and Informatics
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Phone: (301) 594-7719
Email: castlea@mail.nih.gov

Content

Diabetes Impact Award-Closed Loop Technologies: Clinical, Physiological and Behavioral Approaches to Improve Type 1 Diabetes Outcomes (DP3)
(RFA-DK-12-020)
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
Application Receipt Date(s): March 28, 2013

This FOA issued by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health, encourages Research Project Grant (DP3) applications from institutions/organizations proposing human studies to develop and/or test a highly reliable, wearable, portable, easy to operate system linking continuous glucose monitoring and pancreatic hormone delivery in a closed loop system. This research is intended to improve glucose control and quality of life of patients with type 1 diabetes. Only human studies will be considered responsive to this FOA.

Content

Diabetes Impact Award-Closed Loop Technologies: Development and Integration of Novel Components for an Automated Artificial Pancreas System (DP3)
(RFA-DK-12-021)
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
Application Receipt Date(s): March 28, 2013

This FOA issued by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health, encourages Research Project Grant (DP3) applications from institutions/organizations proposing original research addressing the development of new technologies that may be integrated in a wearable, portable, automated, closed loop system for a physiological glucose control in individuals who suffer of Type 1 diabetes.