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STAR

Houston, Texas

Representation of several types of stem cells
STaR Center
not shown on screen

Elizabeth Davis, Ph.D.

Elizabeth Davis, PhDAssistant Professor
Department of Pediatrics - Hematology-Oncology

Phone: 713-798-1253
E-mail: edavis@bcm.edu

Education

  • B.S., Allegheny College, Meadeville, PA
  • Ph.D., University of Rochester, Rochester, NY

Research Interests

Dr. Olmsted-Davis's research program encompasses the use of viral vectors in both the clinical and basic science areas of bone formation and bone fracture repair. The first area is to develop a safe efficacious system that will deliver a protein known to invoke bone formation. This system is being developed to enhance bone repair during fractures, which will eliminate many problems faced by orthopedic surgeons such as nonunion of the broken bone and to treat fractures in elderly population, which often are difficult to immobilize without surgical intervention. Recently this work, through a collaboration with a major pharmaceutical company, has also been directed towards fixation of the spine, a common treatment for a number of different spine problems.

The second area of interest is in understanding the signal transduction pathways that lead a stem cell into becoming an osteoblast or cell that produces bone. Dr. Olmsted-Davis discovered an enzyme required for cells to become osteoblasts and has been awarded a grant from NIAMs to further identify the protein's function. The lab is utilizing adenovirus vectors to identify the exact functions and cellular pathways of this enzyme. The end goal of this project would be to understand the events that lead to cells becoming osteoblasts and making bone.

The last area of interest is in adult stem cell research. Dr. Olmsted-Davis, along with Dr. Davis, has identified a common precursor, which is both a hematopoietic stem cell and osteoblast stem cell. Together, they are currently evaluating both the signals that lead to stem cell recruitment for bone formation, and the cellular mechanisms that lead to new bone. This bone formation model is also being used as a system to test various agents that may block bone formation, in the hopes of developing a treatment for various genetic and injury induced diseases that result in unwanted bone formation in muscle and other tissues.

Dr. Olmsted-Davis has also been involved with establishing a Vector Development Laboratory, a non-profit core facility at Baylor College of Medicine, which provides gene therapy vectors for use as gene delivery systems for the clinic, as well as basic research tools for understanding gene/protein function.

Selected Publications

  • Laura J. Mauro, Elizabeth A. Olmsted, Beverley M. Skrobacz, Robert J. Mourey, Alan R. Davis, Jack E. Dixon (1994) Identification of a Hormonally-Regulated PTP Associated with Bone and Testicular Differentiation, J Biol Chem 269:30659-30667.
  • Laura J. Mauro, Elizabeth A, Olmsted, Alan R. Davis, and Jack E. Dixon (1995) PTH Regulates the Expression of the Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase OST-PTP, in Rat Osteoblast-Like Cells, Endocrin 137:925-933.
  • Francis H. Gannon, Frederick S. Kaplan, Elizabeth A. Olmsted, Gerald C. Finkel, Michael Zasloff, and Eileen Shore (1996) Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2/4 in Early Fibromatous Lesions of Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva. Human Path 28:339-343.
  • Elizabeth A. Olmsted, Francis H. Gannon, Zhao-Qi Wang, Agamemnon E. Grigoriadis, Erwin Wagner, and Frederick S. Kaplan (1998) Embryonic Over-expression of the c-Fos Proto-Oncogene: A Murine Stem Cell Chimera Applicable to the study of Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva in Humans. Clinic Ortho Rel Res 346:81-95.
  • Thomas F. Lanchoney, Elizabeth A. Olmsted, Vicki Rosen, Michael Zasloff, Eileen M. Shore, and Frederick S. Kaplan (1998) Characterization of BMP-4 Receptor Expression in Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progessiva. Clinic Ortho Rel Res 346:38-46.
  • George L. Yeh, Sameer Mathur, Ashley Wivel, Ming Li, Elizabeth A. Olmsted, Francis H. Gannon, Angels Ulied, Laura Audi, Frederick S. Kaplan, and Eileen M. Shore (2000) GNAS1 mutation and cbfa1 misexpression in a child with severe congenital plate-like osteoma cutis: A variant of progressive ossesous heteroplasia. J Bone Miner Res 15:2063-2073.
  • Elizabeth A. Olmsted-Davis, Jeremy S. Blum, Donna Rill, Patricia Yotnda, Zbigniew Gugala, Ronald W. Lindsey, Alan R. Davis (2001) Adenovirus-Mediated BMP2 Expression in Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells. J Cell Biochem 82:11-21.
  • Maria Rosa Maduro, Elizabeth Davis, Alan Davis, Dolores J. Lamb (2002) Osteotesticular Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (OST-PTP) Expression in Testis. J Urol 167(5):2282-2283.
  • Elizabeth A. Olmsted-Davis, Zbigniew Gugala, Francis Gannon, Patricia Yotdna, Robert McAlhany, Ronald Lindsey, and Alan R. Davis (2002) Use of a Chimeric Adenovirus Vector Enhances BMP2 Production and Bone Formation. Hum Gene Ther 13:1337-1347.
  • Elizabeth A. Olmsted, Frederick S. Kaplan, and Eileen M. Shore (2002) Mechanisms Controlling Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 Message Expression in Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva (In press: Clinic Ortho Rel Res).
  • Zbigniew Gugala, Elizabeth A. Olmsted-Davis, Francis H. Gannon, Ronald W. Lindsey, Alan R. Davis (2002) Osteoinduction by Ex Vivo Adenovirus-Mediated BMP2 Delivery Is Independent of Cell Type (In Press: Gene Therapy).
  • Elizabeth A. Olmsted , Frederick S. Kaplan, and Eileen M. Shore (2003) Mechanisms Controlling Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 Message Expression in Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva. Clinic Ortho Rel Res 408:331-343.
  • Zbigniew Gugala, Elizabeth A. Olmsted-Davis, Francis H. Gannon, Ronald W. Lindsey, and Alan R. Davis (2003) Osteoinduction by Ex Vivo Adenovirus-Mediated BMP2 Delivery Is Independent of Cell Type. Gene Ther 10(16):1289-1296.
  • Elizabeth A. Olmsted-Davis , Zbigniew Gugala, Fernando Carmargo, Francis H. Gannon, Kathy Jo Jackson, Kirsten Anderson Kienstra, H. David Shine, Ronald W. Lindsey, Karen K. Hirschi, Maragaret A. Goodell, Malcolm A. Brenner, and Alan R. Davis (2003). Primitive Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cells Can Function as Osteoblast Precursors. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100(26):15877-15882.
  • R. Dacquin, P.J. Mee, J. Kawaguchi, E. Olmsted-Davis , J. Gallagher, J. Nichols, K. Lee, G. Karsenty and A. Smith (2004). Knock-in of nuclear localised ß-galactosidase reveals that the tyrosine phosphatase Ptprv is specifically expressed in cells of the bone collar. Dev Dynamics 229:826-34.

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