Baylor College of Medicine News

Research News

Novel cell therapy from 'naïve' cells recognizes, attacks high-risk viruses for first time in cord blood transplant patientsApr 29, 2015
Virus-specific cell therapy used in cord blood transplant patients successfully prevented 3 of the most problematic post-transplant viruses affecting this group of patients – cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and adenovirus.
IL-33 promotes colorectal cancer tumor-growing environment Apr 27, 2015
Researchers from Baylor College of Medicine have unlocked new clues about how the colorectal cancer tumor microenvironment is formed and regulated.
Baylor receives Avon Foundation grants for research, community care Apr 27, 2015
Baylor College of Medicine has received two new grants totaling $325,000 from the Avon Foundation for Women that will help its physicians and researchers continue to improve access to life-saving breast cancer prevention and treatment resources.
Gene mutations found to cause hereditary autoimmune-mediated lung disease, arthritisApr 20, 2015
Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Human Immunobiology researchers discover genetic cause of autoimmune disorder.
2014 case of human form of “mad cow disease” highlights need for continued surveillanceApr 16, 2015
The identification of a patient who died from the human form of “mad cow disease” demonstrates the need for continued global tracking and awareness of the prion disorder, according to Baylor researchers.
Looking for a shift could provide molecular diagnosis in rare diseaseApr 16, 2015
“Frame shift” – the insertion of genetic material that interrupts the recipe for a particular protein – could explain many cases of Robinow syndrome.
Caffeinated drinks associated with decreased risk of liver scarringApr 14, 2015
Modest daily consumption of caffeinated drinks like coffee, tea and soda associated with less advanced liver scarring in people with hepatitis C.
Enzyme cuts path for T-cells to fight solid tumorsApr 13, 2015
T-cells specifically engineered to express enzyme heparanase have an improved ability to infiltrate the extracellular matrix surrounding solid tumors.
Depolarizing wave may trigger sudden death in epilepsyApr 8, 2015
A slow, depolarizing electrical wave – sometimes called a “brain tsunami” – may be the hidden cause of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy, according to Baylor researchers.
MiMIC proves versatile in fruit fliesApr 2, 2015
Minos-mediated integration cassette provided the basis for building a large protein collection that allows researchers to assess expression of genes and proteins under the microscope in unfixed tissues.