BCM milestones

March 1, 2012

Two milestones were recently recognized at Baylor College of Medicine – the department of molecular and human genetics celebrated its quarter-century mark and Dr. Bert O'Malley was honored for his 50 years working in science.

Molecular and human genetics celebrates 25

Dr. Thomas Caskey and Dr. Arthur Beaudet were part of the molecular and human genetic’s 25th anniversary celebration.
Dr. Thomas Caskey and Dr. Arthur Beaudet were part of the molecular and human genetic’s 25th anniversary celebration.

A gala at the Houston Museum of Natural Science kicked off BCM's department of molecular and human genetics 2012 Anniversary Retreat and Alumni Scientific Symposium, held to honor the group's quarter century of genetics research and clinical care.

The event, chaired by Dr. Arthur Beaudet, chair of the department, and Dr. Brendan Lee, professor in the department, was three years in the making, thrown off schedule by Hurricane Ike and the national financial meltdown. After the gala, the department's retreat in Galveston was marked by a daylong Alumni Scientific Symposium that featured presentations by the department's alumni from around the world, most of whom stayed for the department's scientific retreat that took place over the next two days.

50 years in science

Dr. Bert O’Malley was honored recently for his 50 years working in science.
Dr. Bert O’Malley was honored recently for his 50 years working in science.

Dr. Bert O'Malley, chair of molecular and cellular biology at BCM, celebrated "Five Decades of Steroid Receptors and Coregulators" with his colleagues, former and current students and collaborators, in a symposium in late December.

O'Malley said he had resisted the idea but finally gave in as long as it remained low key and "in the family." The day-long session explored the world of steroid receptors and coregulators – fields that the National Medal of Science recipient pioneered over his decades of research.

O'Malley himself capped off the day with a discussion of the personal beliefs and the science that has guided his career. At the end of the meeting, Dr. William T. Schrader, deputy scientific director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, and the event's organizer, presented O'Malley with a plaque signed by more than 110 of his trainees.