Latest news from Baylor College of Medicine

Improving effective leadership important to patient careApr 21, 2016
The Society of Surgical Chairs has recently released key tenets to improve leadership.
Largest-ever U.S. autism research study underwayApr 21, 2016
Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital are part of an autism research initiative to advance the understanding of the causes of this condition.
Exercise may slow symptoms of Parkinson’s diseaseApr 21, 2016
Experts at Baylor College of Medicine say that for some, regular exercise could slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease.
Researchers explore new methods to suppress menstrual cyclesApr 21, 2016
Dr. Virginia Wotring writes that long-acting reversible contraceptives can be safe and reliable for stopping menstrual cycles.
Study finds genes linked to happiness, depression and neuroticismApr 20, 2016
A multi-institutional team, including a researcher from Baylor College of Medicine, reports that they have found genetic variants associated with our feelings of well-being, depression and neuroticism.
Teenagers and plastic surgery: Make an informed decision Apr 20, 2016
An expert at Baylor College of Medicine explains the importance of knowing the facts and consequences before teens seek plastic surgery.
New class of small molecule drug, SI-2, has potential for improving cancer treatmentApr 15, 2016
Baylor researchers find that SI-2 can inhibit tumor growth in mouse models and could be used to develop drugs against key drivers of many cancers.
Discovery of asprosin, new hormone could have potential implications in treatment of diabetesApr 14, 2016
Researchers determined that they could use an antibody to neutralize asprosin, which could potentially lead to a treatment for diabetes.
Mutations in RERE gene result in features that coincide with those associated with 1p36 deletion syndromeApr 14, 2016
RERE mutations alone can cause developmental problems typical of 1p36 deletions.
Experts warn HPV related cancer on the rise in U.S.Apr 13, 2016
The last three decades have seen a rise in the cases of head and neck cancer and a shift in the cause of such cancers, according to experts at Baylor College of Medicine.