Latest news from Baylor College of Medicine

Vital links between brain tumors, epileptic seizures foundFeb 7, 2017
Research suggests detecting brain tumors at the earliest possible stage and eliminating them before seizures begin might be possible one day.
Research finds strategy that may treat juvenile Batten diseaseFeb 6, 2017
Researchers have discovered a treatment that improves the neurological symptoms in a mouse model of juvenile Batten disease.
Follow your heart… to the doctor’s officeFeb 6, 2017
Doctors at Baylor College of Medicine say while heart palpitations are common, they should not be ignored.
Successful study leads experts to call for more patientsFeb 3, 2017
Fetal endotracheal occlusion surgery is now being studied in a new clinical trial to determine whether it is helpful to babies with a more moderate form of left congenital diaphragmatic hernia.
Fetal therapy for severe diaphragmatic hernia shown feasibleFeb 3, 2017
Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital have the largest experience in the U.S for treating severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia with FETO.
$3.3M effort to map human genome’s intricate folding patternFeb 2, 2017
The NIH announced eight mapping centers, including one at Baylor, will help lead the next four-year phase of its project to identify all of the functional elements contained in the human genome. 
New treatment options will bring tears to your eyesFeb 2, 2017
New specialized treatments available at the Alkek Eye Center in the Cullen Eye Institute at Baylor College of Medicine are helping patients with dry eyes see clearly again.
Matters of the HeartFeb 1, 2017
Doctors at Baylor College of Medicine have answers to some commonly asked questions to help jump starting your path to a healthy heart.
Expert explains importance of respecting other cultures Jan 30, 2017
Dr. Asim Shah offers tips on how people can learn more about different cultures.
Researchers find Zika virus replicates in placental trophoblastsJan 27, 2017
Findings lend hope to the possibility that care providers could use existing prenatal diagnostic techniques to detect the Zika virus and find a way to stop its spread to the fetus.