Latest news from Baylor College of Medicine

How to beat the Sunday bluesSep 19, 2017
Have you ever felt sad or anxious on a Sunday night? As it turns out, you could be experiencing a common phenomenon known as the Sunday Night Blues.
Hurricane Harvey's impact on allergy sufferers Sep 18, 2017
One of the most common post-Hurricane Harvey health issues that people are facing are worsening allergies, and there are numerous reasons for this, according to Dr. David Corry,
How to incorporate fitness into your daily life Sep 14, 2017
Dr. Irvin Sulapas gives his tips on how to incorporate fitness into your daily life.
Gut microbes might help prevent, treat colorectal cancerSep 13, 2017
The gut microbiome might one day help prevent and treat colorectal cancer, according to researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children’s Hospital and Columbia University.
Experts say 2017-2018 flu season could be severeSep 13, 2017
Beginning this fall, it’s important to get vaccinated soon against influenza, according to Dr. Robert Atmar.
Dr. Carlos Galvani named chief of metabolic, bariatric surgerySep 12, 2017
Dr. Carlos Galvani, an expert in bariatric and robotic surgery, has joined the Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery at Baylor College of Medicine as chief of metabolic and bariatric surgery.
DNA looping may lead to opportunities to treat brain tumorsSep 11, 2017
The discovery of a mechanism by which normal brain cells regulate the expression of the NFIA gene might one day help improve therapies to treat brain tumors.
Contact lens care after swimming in floodwaters Sep 7, 2017
Dr. Stephen Pflugfelder has advice for contact lens wearers on how to properly care for their eyes after being exposed to floodwaters brought in by Hurricane Harvey.
Device accurately identifies cancer in seconds during surgerySep 6, 2017
A new handheld device rapidly and accurately identifies cancerous tissue during surgery, delivering results in about 10 seconds.
Hookworms, poverty, poor sanitation linked in rural AlabamaSep 6, 2017
Problems with poor sanitation linked to extreme poverty also have resulted in a recurrence or persistence of hookworm infection in rural areas of Alabama