Latest news from Baylor College of Medicine

Expert gives tips on how to prevent summer brain drainJul 6, 2017
Summer is a time when most students are able to relax and have fun away from the classroom, but it also can be a time when important lessons learned during the year are forgotten.
Researchers build SEQSpark to analyze huge genetic data setsJun 29, 2017
A led by Dr. Suzanne Leal developed software called SEQSpark to overcome obstacles processing large amounts of exome and genome data.
Study looks at lowering untreatable heart attack risk factorJun 29, 2017
Dr. Christi Ballantyne explains a study that evaluates a possible treatment to reduce the strongest inherited risk factor for heart attack and stroke.
Novel mouse model more closely resembles human liver Jun 28, 2017
Researchers have developed a new mouse model with human cells which show more accurate results as to how a human might metabolize a drug.
Expert discusses common OCD misconceptionsJun 27, 2017
Dr. Elizabeth McIngvale discusses common misconceptions about obsessive compulsive disorder and gives her advice on the best treatment options for OCD.
Baylor named site for NCI proteogenomics analysis, researchJun 27, 2017
The Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center was named the only Proteogenomic Translational Research Center site in the South.
Genomic sequencing may benefit parents of cancer patientsJun 26, 2017
Researchers report that genomic sequencing information may be more valuable for families of pediatric cancer patients than has previously been recognized.
What you need to know about flea and tick bites this summerJun 26, 2017
Infectious diseases expert Dr. Laila Woc-Colburn tells you what you need to know this flea and tick season.
Patient-inspired research uncovers new link to rare disorder Jun 22, 2017
Meeting a young patient with Zellweger syndrome, a rare, life-threatening genetic disease, started a scientific investigation that culminated with an unexpected discovery.
Staying hydrated is key for elder adults this summerJun 22, 2017
As temperatures continue to rise, the risk of heat exhaustion, heat stroke and dehydration also increase among adults 65 years of age and older.