Baylor College of Medicine scientists Drs. Margaret “Peggy” Goodell, Brendan Lee, David Nelson and Theodore Wensel have been named 2014 Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) – the world’s largest general scientific society – an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers to acknowledge their distinguished efforts to advance science.

The Baylor scientists were recognized in the AAAS section on biological sciences for the following: 

Goodell, director of the Stem Cells  and Regenerative Medicine Center at Baylor, for distinguished contributions to the field of stem cell biology, particularly genetic and epigenetic regulation of self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells. See Goodell’s bio.

Lee, interim chair of molecular and human genetics at Baylor, for distinguished contributions to the field of translational genetic medicine particularly in causes, mechanisms, and treatment of inborn errors of metabolism and skeletal disorders. See Lee’s bio.

Nelson, a professor of molecular and human genetics at Baylor, for distinguished contributions to understanding how repeat expansions contribute to human disease, and for extraordinary service to the American Society of Human Genetics. See Nelson’s bio.

Wensel, chair of the Verna and Marrs McLean Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, for groundbreaking discoveries in the field of sensory signaling, including the roles of members of the regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS) family of proteins. See Wensel’s bio.

Goodell, Lee, Nelson and Wensel join nine other Baylor scientists as AAAS fellows including Drs. Janet Butel, Tom Caskey, Mary Estes, Adam Kuspa, James Lupski, Jianpeng Ma, Bert O’Malley, Susan Rosenberg and Salih Wakil.

The AAAS announced 401 new Fellows today who will be recognized on February 14 at the AAAS Fellows Forum during the 2015 AAAS Annual Meeting in San Jose, Calif. and will be formally announced in the AAAS News & Notes section of the journal Science on November 28, 2014.