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Molecular and Cellular Biology

Houston, Texas

Image 1: Ovulated mouse cumulus cell oocyte complex immunostained for matrix proteins hyaluronan and versican. By JoAnne Richards, Ph.D.; Image 2: By Yi LI, Ph.D.; Image 3: Mouse oocyte at meiosis I immunostained  for tubulin (red) phosphop38MAPK (green) and DNA (blue). By JoAnne Richards,  Ph.D.;  Image 4: Expanded cumulus cell ooctye ocmplex  immunostained for hyaluronan (red), TSG6 (green) and DAN (blue). By JoAnne  Richards, Ph.D.;  Image 5: Epithelial cells taken from a mouse  mammary gland were cultured in a dish and transduced with a retrovirus  expressing two genes. The green staining shows green fluorescent protein and the red  staining shows progesterone receptor expression. The nucleus of each cell is  stained blue. Photomicrograph taken at 200X magnification.  By Sandra L. Grimm,  Ph.D.; Image 6: Ovarian vasculature (red) is excluded from the granulosa cells (blue) within growing follicles (round structures); Image 7:  Ovulated mouse cumulus cell oocyte  complex immunostained for matrix proteins hyaluronan and versican. By JoAnne Richards, Ph.D.
Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology
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Tissue and Cell Culture Core Laboratory

Service and Expertise

The Tissue and Cell Culture Core Laboratory maintains active cultures of many types of mammalian cell lines as well as maintains frozen stocks of a larger cell library.

General services include maintenance of active eukaryotic cell cultures and plating cells for experimental procedures. The Core also has stocks of a variety of culture media and sera, including charcoal-stripped media, available for purchase. Other services available include cell cloning, establishment of primary cell cultures including mouse embryo fibroblasts, mycoplasma testing, specialized media preparation and generation of stable cell lines.

Core personnel are familiar with various cell culture procedures and are able to advise on methods appropriate for specific experimental objectives.

In situ detection of β-galactosidase expression in transfected mammalian cells. Lab slide
In situ detection of β-galactosidase expression in transfected mammalian cells.

Contact Information

Director: Carolyn L. Smith, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of Molecular & Cellular Biology
Baylor College of Medicine
One Baylor Plaza, DeBakey M522
Houston, TX 77030

Phone: 713-798-6235
E-mail: carolyns@bcm.tmc.edu

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