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Molecular and Cellular Biology

Houston, Texas

Image 1: Ovulated mouse cumulus cell oocyte complex immunostained for matrix proteins hyaluronan and versican. By JoAnne Richards, Ph.D.; Image 2: By Yi LI, Ph.D.; Image 3: Mouse oocyte at meiosis I immunostained  for tubulin (red) phosphop38MAPK (green) and DNA (blue). By JoAnne Richards,  Ph.D.;  Image 4: Expanded cumulus cell ooctye ocmplex  immunostained for hyaluronan (red), TSG6 (green) and DAN (blue). By JoAnne  Richards, Ph.D.;  Image 5: Epithelial cells taken from a mouse  mammary gland were cultured in a dish and transduced with a retrovirus  expressing two genes. The green staining shows green fluorescent protein and the red  staining shows progesterone receptor expression. The nucleus of each cell is  stained blue. Photomicrograph taken at 200X magnification.  By Sandra L. Grimm,  Ph.D.; Image 6: Ovarian vasculature (red) is excluded from the granulosa cells (blue) within growing follicles (round structures); Image 7:  Ovulated mouse cumulus cell oocyte  complex immunostained for matrix proteins hyaluronan and versican. By JoAnne Richards, Ph.D.
Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology
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Robert H. Thalmann, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Neuroscience

Education

Ph.D.: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Postdoctoral training: Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta

Research Interest

Teaching Neuroscience
My role these days is to direct the course “Nervous System” that introduces medical students to the normal and abnormal nervous system. I also teach a condensed graduate course “Neuroanatomy: functional organization of the nervous system”. This course lasts less than a month and is taken by graduate students, postdocs, and the occasional faculty member.

Contact Information

Baylor College of Medicine
One Baylor Plaza, Cullen 114A
Houston, TX 77030

Phone: 713-798-4957
E-mail: thalmann@bcm.edu

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