The Section of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine is nationally recognized for its excellence in healthcare, research and education.

The section has total research support of $4.8 million from federal and private research grants including lung cancer, asthma, COPD, pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary fibrosis, transitional medicine, lung transplant, and cystic fibrosis.

Many physicians from the section are national and international experts. Together, they offer an incredibly large array of services, from general pulmonary and sleep medicine to highly specialized advanced lung diseases, such as including pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary fibrosis, adult cystic fibrosis, COPD/asthma, interstitial lung disease, lung and heart-lung transplantation, critical care, and interventional pulmonology.

The section offers four fellowship programs, including Pulmonary & Critical Care, Critical Care Medicine, Lung Transplantation, and Sleep Medicine. Many alumni and former fellows can be found in academic, research and healthcare leadership roles.

News

Differences in metabolism between androgen-dependent and castration resistant prostate cancer may lead to new therapiesMay 19, 2016
Researchers have determined that castration resistant prostate cancer has particular metabolic characteristics that may open new possibilities for treatment. 
Baylor medical students among 66 awarded fellowships by HHMIMay 19, 2016
Two Baylor College of Medicine medical students have been awarded fellowships by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, allowing them to spend a year working on individual proposed research projects.
Don’t flop on foot support this summerMay 18, 2016
Considering sandals for the summer? Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Jason Ahuero says pick sandals that provide arch support and keep feet secure.
Researchers uncover marker important to effectiveness of natural killer T cellsMay 16, 2016
Researchers identified a molecular marker of NKT cells that could lead to effective cancer immunotherapy.
Breast cancer tumor-initiating cells use mTOR signaling to recruit suppressor cells to promote tumor growthMay 16, 2016
Baylor College of Medicine researchers report a new mechanism that helps cancer cells engage myeloid-derived suppressor for growth.