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Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Houston, Texas

Images from biochemistry and molecular biology research
Verna and Marrs McLean Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
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Francis T. F. Tsai, D.Phil.

Tsai photoProfessor

Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

Department of Molecular & Cellular Biology

ftsai@bcm.edu

Tsai Lab web site

Education

  • D.Phil., 1997, Biochemistry, University of Oxford, UK
  • Postdoctoral training, 1996-2000, Molecular Biophysics, Yale University
  • Associate of the Royal College of Science
  • Wellcome Trust International Prize Travelling Fellow
  • Scientist of the American Heart Association

Structure and Function of Macromolecular Machines and Multi-component Assemblies

The focus of our research is to investigate the molecular and structural basis of human disease. We are using a multi-pronged approach that combines molecular biology, biochemistry, structural biology and functional proteomics techniques to provide a detailed mechanistic understanding of the underlying molecular events. Current projects include ATP-dependent molecular machines, transcription regulatory complexes and multi-component assemblies involved in DNA repair.

Architecture of a human ternary TFIIBc-TBPc complex bound to a 17 base pair long segment of the adenovirus major late promoter.


Architecture of a human ternary TFIIBc-TBPc complex bound to a 17 base pair long segment of the adenovirus major late promoter. Human TBPc is colored in red and human TFIIBc in green. The figure depicts the content of a single asymmetric unit. There are five ternary complexes that are distinguished by alternating dark and light yellow (coding strand) and dark and light blue (non-coding strand) of the DNA. The crystal is formed of `infinite' strands of essentially B-DNA angulated in the 8 base pair TATA-box through contact with human TBPc (Tsai and Sigler, 2000).


View articles published by Dr. Tsai

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