Displaying 1 - 10 of 20 for Healthy Volunteers - Adult
  • ABOVE Study (H-41632)
    • The purpose of this research study is to gather head, body, face dynamics, gaze and vocal data along with simultaneous recording of brain activity for subjects with and without OCD.
  • Adult Volunteers Needed (H-34291)
    • Healthy, overweight volunteers aged 18 to 65 and volunteers diagnosed with type two diabetes within the last three years, also aged 18 to 65, are needed for a metabolic study.
  • Alcohol Abuse Study (H-40327)
    • The purpose of this study is to find out if a new drug can reduce alcohol abuse.
  • Asthma Study (H-37748)
    • The purpose of this study is to better understand why some patients have severe asthma.
  • Autism Spectrum Disorder Study (H-29411)
    • This study examines how individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder integrate audio and visual cues when judging the location of an audio-visual stimulus in the world. 
  • Brain Imaging Study (H-33628)
    • This study needs healthy volunteers for a brain imaging study, as well as patients whose part of the brain that controls vision, as a result of stroke, traumatic brain injury, brain tumor, neurodegenerative or, neurodevelopmental diseases has been injured.
  • Cardiovascular Study (H-30665)
    • 12-21 year old adolescents and young adults (normal weight and overweight) with and without type 2 diabetes are needed for a research study investigating risk for heart disease in youth.
  • COPD Gene Study (H-22209)
    • Baylor College of Medicine is recruiting non-smoker men and women to participate this nationwide research study.
  • COPD Research Study (H-41423)
    • This study is recruiting healthy adults (age between 40 and 60 inclusively) and adults with COPD, chronic bronchitis or emphysema and quit smoking after a heavy smoking history of 20 pack-years.
  • Emphysema Progression Biomarker Study (H-38653)
    • This is an observational study in healthy subjects and patients with COPD to assess the relationship between clinical, imaging and biomarker measurements, and progression of emphysema over two years.